See Photos of all the Chiefs of Army Staff of Nigeria

The Chief of Army Staff (COAS) is the highest-ranking military officer of the Nigerian Army. The position of the COAS is usually the most senior commissioned officer and is appointed by the Commander-in-Chief of the Armed Forces of Nigeria. The Chief of Army Staff reports to the Chief of Defence Staff (CDS). The primary duty of the COAS is to see to the formulation and execution of policies geared towards the highest attainment of national security and operational competence of the force. Apart from the President, the COAS is the only person who can give a direct order to any soldier in the country. Below is a list and the photos of the chiefs of army staff of the Nigerian Army, the first three chiefs of the Nigerian Army were referred to as the General Officers Commanding (GOC), the first COAS was Yakubu Gowon:

  1. Major-General Kenneth G. Exham, 1956 – 1959
  2. Major-General Foster
  3. Major-General John Alexander Mackenzie, 1963
  4. Major-General Sir Christopher Welby-Everard, 1963 – 1965
  5. Major-General Johnson Aguiyi-Ironsi, 1965 – 1966
  6. Lieutenant-Colonel Yakubu Gowon, January 1966 – July 1966
  7. Lieutenant-Colonel Joseph Akahan, May 1967 – May 1968 See Photos of the Chiefs of Army Staff of Nigeria
  8. Major-General Hassan Katsina, May 1968 – January 1971 See Photos of the Chiefs of Army Staff of Nigeria 2
  9. Major-General David Ejoor, January 1971 – July 1975 See Photos of the Chiefs of Army Staff of Nigeria 3
  10. Lieutenant-General Theophilus Danjuma, July 1975 – October 1979 See Photos of the Chiefs of Army Staff of Nigeria 4
  11. Lieutenant-General Ipoola Alani Akinrinade, October 1979 – April 1980 See Photos of the Chiefs of Army Staff of Nigeria 5
  12. Lieutenant-General Gibson Jalo, April 1980 – October 1981 See Photos of the Chiefs of Army Staff of Nigeria 6
  13. Lieutenant-General Mohammed Inuwa Wushishi, October 1981 – October 1983 See Photos of the Chiefs of Army Staff of Nigeria 7
  14. Major-General Ibrahim Babangida, January 1984 – August 1985 See Photos of the Chiefs of Army Staff of Nigeria 8
  15. Lieutenant-General Sani Abacha, August 1985 – August 1990 See Photos of the Chiefs of Army Staff of Nigeria 9
  16. Lieutenant-General Salihu Ibrahim, August 1990 – September 1993 See Photos of the Chiefs of Army Staff of Nigeria 10
  17. Lieutenant-General Aliyu Gusau, September 1993 – November 1993 See Photos of the Chiefs of Army Staff of Nigeria 11
  18. Major-General Chris Alli, November 1993 – August 1994 See Photos of the Chiefs of Army Staff of Nigeria 12
  19. Major-General Alwali Kazir, August 1994 – March 1996 See Photos of the Chiefs of Army Staff of Nigeria 13
  20. Lieutenant-General Ishaya Bamaiyi, March 1996 – May 1999 See Photos of the Chiefs of Army Staff of Nigeria 14
  21. Lieutenant-General Victor Malu, May 1999 – April 2001  See Photos of the Chiefs of Army Staff of Nigeria General Victor Malu
  22. Lieutenant-General Alexander Ogomudia, April 2001 – June 2003 See Photos of the Chiefs of Army Staff of Nigeria 10 Alexander Ogomudia
  23. Lieutenant-General Martin Luther Agwai, June 2003 – June 2006 See Photos of the Chiefs of Army Staff of Nigeria 10 Martin Luther Agwai
  24. Lieutenant-General Owoye Andrew Azazi, 1st June 2006 – May 2007 See Photos of the Chiefs of Army Staff of Nigeria 10 Andrew Owoye Azazi
  25. Lieutenant-General Luka Yusuf, June 2007 – August 2008 See Photos of the Chiefs of Army Staff of Nigeria 10 General Luka Nyeh Yusuf
  26. Lieutenant-General Abdulrahman Bello Dambazau, August 2008 – September 2010 See Photos of the Chiefs of Army Staff of Nigeria 10 Abdulrahman Dambazau
  27. Lieutenant-General Onyabor Azubuike Ihejirika, September 2010 – January 2014  See Photos of the Chiefs of Army Staff of Nigeria Azubuike Ihejirika
  28. Lieutenant-General Kenneth Minimah, January 2014 – July 2015 Lt Gen Kenneth Tobiah Jacob Minimah Biography Life Story Photo
  29. Lieutenant-General Tukur Yusuf Buratai, July 2015 –
  30. Lt General TY Buratai Chief of Army Staff

 

 

FULL CREDITS : Naijarchives

See What Nigerians Were Saying About Babangida’s Government In 1985

In December 1985, Nigeria’s military president, Ibrahim Babangida, was celebrating his 100 days in office. He had overthrown Major-General Muhammadu Buhari and installed himself. Nigerians of that time were interviewed about what they felt about the new military government and this was what they had to say: 

See What Nigerians Were Saying About Babangida's Government In 1985

Babangida as the military head of state circa 1985.

Samuel Mbakwe Writes from Prison (November 4) has drawn public attention once more to the issue of those convicted for political offences. Many of the political convicts have had their cases determined and sentences passed by Idiagbon even before they were made to face the kangaroo courts called military tribunals, General Babangida should heal all the wounds inflicted on this nation by the Buhari/Idiagbon administration by releasing all those convicted by the teleguided military tribunals. – Prince ‘Remi Adegbola, Ila Orangun.

Sam Coffie-Ukobo, Senior Management Staff, UAC Group, Lagos: ‘His liberalism has endeared him to a lot of people but the question is whether that approach is consonant with the emergency situation in which we find ourselves. In his first hundred days, definitely I give Babangida more than an average score. I consider the free-for-all IMF debate as a mistake on his side. It has confused the situation much and those who don’t even understand what they are talking about are making the loudest noise. He would have sorted the IMF loan out quietly between himself and his advisers. I am sure they would not have misled him. He is too accessible and open. Occasionally government should assert itself forcefully and with authority in carrying out its functions. Already we notice that a great deal of laxity is setting in as Nigerians are abusing the privilege given them by the president. He has the advantage of being loved by so many Nigerians. He should exploit that love given to him to make Nigeria a better place for all.’

  1. Sunday Jobson, Accounts Clerk, VYB, Apapa: ‘The abrogation of Decree Numner 4 (DN4) is, for me, a major achievement because it has given journalists and Nigerians as a whole the opportunity to partake and contribute toward a better Nigeria. Again, the ban on importation of rice is an achievement because it has fetched Nigeria huge foreign exchange used in importing rice. However, there is no more discipline. The sanitation and so many other aspects of WAI are declining. I think it is a great mistake for the president to relax the war against indiscipline. I had thought the president would strive to lower prices of essential commodities and rent. The high price of goods, services and rent is still a great burden for the masses.’

Mrs. Affiong Etuk (Housewife), Aguda, Lagos: I think the president has not achieved anything. I am concerned about prices of food in the market and since he came to power, prices have gone up higher. Take, for instance, frozen fish which used to be the fish for the poor, it is now a luxury because it is very expensive. The prices of palm oil, meat, onions, etc, have all gone up. Their biggest mistake is to neglect WAI. Now everybody is doing what he likes. The environment is no more clean because the environmental sanitation aspect of WAI has been abandoned.

Isa Malam, Roadside Trader, Lagos: ‘I am happy we (roadside traders) have been allowed to sell whatever we have on the road side, otherwise some of us would have been starving. I think this is an achievement by the president. He has made things easier for us and most of us are not suffering like in the days of Buhari and Idiagbon. The man (Babangida) is starting alright but I don’t know whether he will make mistakes as time goes on. For now, I don’t have any problem with him. He is my friend. I had thought when Babangida came tht he will make the prices of food and other commodities to go down. But, unfortunately, prices are still very high. This is my only concern.’’

Wale Ogundipe, Student, Ondo State University: ‘In my opinion, he has achieved a lot in the area of fundamental human rights. The press is very free and the relationship between government and students has improved tremendously for the better. But the problem is that the economy is where it was when he came in, if not worse.’

Obram Esedafa, an unemployed mechanical engineering graduate of UNN: ‘Things are tough, so you cannot expect any positive change now. Because of that, Babangida has not achieved anything yet. But from his policies, in two years time things are going to be much better. Besides, I think he is more realistic than Idiagbon and Buhari.’

Murudeen Adeyi, a company manager in the West African Drug Company: ‘Babangida has thrown more light to the nation by asking us to show our mind. Take the IMF for instance. It has allowed people to say what they wish. Babangida’s sole mistake so far is the ban on the importation of rice. The announcement should not have been made on radio. It should have been confidential, so that when people place orders for import licence on those goods, the government would have gradually and quietly turned them down. But when the capitalists in Nigeria heard it on radio, they immediately raised prices.’

Dele Oduwale, a law student at Unife: ‘The release of political detainees is an achievement. It has gone a long way to bring the country together. Many of the detainees pledged their support to the government when they were released. It may have been a political play by Babangida, but it united the people of this diverse country. Economically, he has been trying. The recent pay cut is an attempt to revamp the economy, also his recent attempt to woo foreign investors, and the recent announcements that foreign accounts can now be opened in Nigeria. The IMF debate is also an achievement. It gave people the opportunity to discuss what touches them.’

Credits/References: Pluses and Pitfalls: The Man on the Street Assesses Babangida by May Ellen Ezekiel with Anietie Usen and George Otiono, Newswatch

Naijrchives

Buhari’s first year: Five ways Nigeria has changed

President Muhammadu Buhari came to power promising Nigerians “change”. Novelist and writer Adaobi Tricia Nwaubani gives five examples of what has changed in Nigeria since 29 May 2015 when he was sworn in.
1. Are we safer?

Those of us who travel regularly in Nigeria’s north-east had become used to what should be a 15-minute journey turning into an hour-long ordeal.

You had to stop dozens of times at roadblocks and disembark, while heavily armed soldiers inspected your vehicle for traces of the Islamist militant group, Boko Haram.

Today, the number of checkpoints has fallen significantly – even on the road to Chibok – thanks to enhanced confidence in the security of the entire region.

The army has regained swathes of territory that the Islamist militants had occupied as part of their so-called caliphate.
Image copyright AFP
Image caption President Buhari fought the 2015 election on a pledge to boost security

Boko Haram has been considerably weakened, resigned to attacking soft targets using suicide bombers.

Thousands of women and girls kidnapped by the group have also been rescued, including one of the 219 schoolgirls from Chibok abducted in April 2014.

But while there is progress in the north-east, trouble in the Niger Delta, the country’s oil-producing region, is resurfacing.

Recent attacks on oil facilities have caused a drop in production and helped push up the global price of crude oil.

On patrol with Nigerian soldiers
2. Where’s my money?

In the months preceding last year’s elections, the popular chant on the streets was “Sai Buhari, Sai Buhari”, which means “Only Buhari” in Hausa – the most widely-spoken language in the north where the president originates.

“Sai Buhari” became an almost magical greeting, capable of earning you a discount from the sweaty chap pushing a wheelbarrow of tiger nuts or sugar cane.

It could even elicit a smile followed by permission to move along, from the miscellaneous airport officials who usually ensure that your passage through Nigerian customs and immigration is fraught with agonising delays.
Image copyright AFP
Image caption Supporters of President Buhari were hoping that there would be many changes in the country

A year later, the chant has changed to “Buhariya”, which roughly translates to “Buhari’s way” or “Buhari’s time”.

The slogan is now used to explain every unpleasant evidence of Nigeria’s troubled economy and a time of austerity.

Q: “A basket of tomatoes has gone up from 3,000 naira ($15) to 18,000 naira?”

A: It’s “Buhariya!”

Q: “How come the naira is plummeting against the dollar on the black market?”

A: It’s “Buhariya!”

Muhammadu Buhari’s first year in quotes
3. Where’s our money?

This time last year, friendship with Sambo Dasuki, the former national security adviser, could have altered your economic circumstances forever.

He would have been besieged with invitation cards to be the chief guest at various events.
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Media captionMartin Patience reports on Nigeria’s war on corruption

When he entered a room, almost everyone would stand in respect.

Today, he sits in an Abuja jail, awaiting trial for the alleged mismanagement of billions of dollars meant for the war against Boko Haram – charges he denies.

Several other big men, previous untouchables, such as former service chiefs, top politicians and government officials, are also sitting in jail awaiting corruption trials, or out on bail.

And, if you’re looking for a second-hand luxury car to buy, now may be the time.

A number of people formerly linked to the government are desperate for cash and selling off their fleets.

It would seem as though the leaking taps that gushed dollars to be spent carelessly have stopped flowing since President Buhari came to power.

Buhari’s battle to clean up the oil industry
4. Where are the women?

Ensuring women’s participation at all levels in political, economic and public life is one of the targets of the UN’s sustainable development goals (SDGs).

But oly six out of Mr Buhari’s cabinet of 37 are women, a meagre 16% and way down on the previous administration’s 31%.

Adaobi Tricia Nwaubani:
Image copyright Adaobi Tricia Nwaubani

“The president’s wife, Aisha… appears as the stereotypical good African wife.”

The president’s wife, Aisha, is also the most silent first lady Nigeria has had in decades, barely seen or heard – except maybe when she is visiting unkempt children in a refugee camp or donating food items to victims of Boko Haram. She appears as the stereotypical good African wife.

Her invisibility is suspicious when you consider that President Buhari, during his election campaign, said he would abolish the office of the first lady – but then retracted the suggestion when challenged by feminist voters.
5. What are we wearing?

In Abuja the government in power influences the style of dress throughout the administration.

Staff of the government, friends of the government and aspiring friends of the government all aim to dress like the person at the top.

Northerners ruled Nigeria for most of the country’s first three decades after independence from the UK in 1960.

Over time, their traditional outfits, babarigas (flowing gowns) and kaftans, became firmly entrenched – even when a non-northerner was elected in 1999.
Image copyright AFP
Image caption Sartorial styles have passed from Goodluck Jonathan (left) to Muhammadu Buhari (right)

Olusegun Obasanjo is an ethnic Yoruba from the south but throughout his eight-year presidential tenure, he mostly wore babarigas.

Cartoons depicting a typical Nigerian “big man” will usually feature him dressed in the flowing robes, his potbelly distorting the layers of cloth.

All this changed in 2011, with the election of Goodluck Jonathan.

He was Nigeria’s first president from one of the country’s smaller ethnic groups, and also the first from the oil-producing Niger Delta, in the south.

Mr Jonathan preferred the long shirt and trouser outfit that is traditional among his Ijaw community.

Suddenly, the babariga was nowhere to be seen.

Government offices and hotel lobbies began to feature an inordinate number of men dressed in the presidential style of the time.

Some even went as far as the fedora hats and walking sticks that go with the outfit.

Eventually, the style gained its own special nickname – “resource control” – in reference to the fact that most people who wore it seemed to be the ones controlling Nigeria’s oil resources.

Indeed, it seemed to be the preferred outfit of many of Nigeria’s newest millionaires.

Not any more. Within a year of Mr Buhari, “resource control” outfits have almost completely vanished from view. The babariga is back.

Beyond these five areas, there are many more profound changes that Nigerians are expecting from our government, but those will take time.

The structure of corruption and mismanagement which previous governments left behind must first be dismantled before a new foundation of progress can be laid.

And President Buhari is no modern-day Hercules.

Cleaning Nigeria’s equivalent of the fantastically filthy Augean stables of Greek myth is certainly not a one-year job.

Credits : BBC.com

My Travails In Sambisa Forest – Female Escapee

The story of Paulina Jabina, an escapee from the dreaded Sambisa forest was as pathetic as it was gory. From the way she escaped death by the whiskers, Jabina could be likened to the proverbial cat with nine lives having cheated death despite passing through the valley of the shadow of death. In this interview with MOHAMMED ISMAIL, she recounts her gory experience in the hands of the Boko Haram insurgents.

For how long did you stay in Sambisa forest?

I stayed in Sambisa forest for about a year.

How was life like staying in the hands of the Insurgents?

We really suffered a lot and we passed through a lot of tribulations to the extent that I thought I would never survive the ordeals. We suffered degrading and dehumanising conditions as we received a lot of beating, we mostly stayed with hunger and most times living on fruits. The only time we got something to eat was when the insurgents raided communities and even at that they usually gives us small morsels which we cook in order to survive. With the success Nigerian Troops are making over the insurgents, the Boko Haram insurgents are now in complete disarray because at a point, we heard their leader saying that he was considering negotiating with the government in order to release the Chibok girls and also heard him a number of times, regretting his actions. Most of the abducted girls have been married off to the Boko Haram fighters while a number of them were sent on suicide missions but even at that, some strong hearted women refused to change their faith.

Have you ever met Chibok girls while at the forest?

I met one girl who told me she was among the abducted Chibok girls. I asked her faith and she said she was a Christian but was forced into joining Islam. We got very close, making the insurgents to be uncomfortable and as such, they separated us and the girl was taken deep into the forest where the leader stays while we were left at the periphery.

We know that Boko Haram insurgents are stealing large amounts of food stuff from raided areas, how come you stated that you don’t get enough food from them?

The food shortage started recently after Nigerian Troops gained a lot of mileage in the fight because whenever the Nigerian troops struck, they usually burned down the Boko haram camps, their food and weaponry.

Can you remember some of the women with whom you stayed in Sambisa forest?

There are thousands of women abducted mostly from Bama, Madagali, Gwoza and Mubi so I can’t remember them by their names. I could only remember them by the name of the places they were abducted from.

Were you listening to Radio while in the forest?

The leaders of the insurgents always listened to news, especially BBC to hear what is happening and from there we also get information about happenings.

How did you leave the forest?

I am glad I escaped but I will tell you that my escape is more of a divine provision than self-effort. While we were staying in Sambisa, we learnt that an old Fulani man rearing cows had helped two women to escape so we met him and asked for his assistance to help us escape and he agreed. On the appointed date, we sneaked at about 7pm to meet the man resulting in a four day trek to freedom which started on Wednesday and ended on Saturday. When we arrived Gwoza, we stayed with soldiers for a week before we were taken to Madagali where I learnt that my father had been killed by the insurgents while majority of my relatives are staying in Yola IDP camp, so people helped me with money to come and get reunited with my family members here in Yola.

Were you married off to one of the insurgents?

I was married to one insurgent called Bana.

Where is he now?

He is in Sambisa now.

How do you cope as a married woman?

They used to beat the hell out of any girl who refuses to submit to their sexual demands. Sometimes they kill or inflict serious body injuries to any girl who refuses to sleep with them.

Are you pregnant?

Yes I am carrying an eight-month old pregnancy right now.

After your escape, how do you remember life in Sambisa forest?

I am just praying to get some stabilisation, especially after delivery and I am praying fervently for God to see me through in life.

Is it true that the insurgents used to give you blood and hard drugs while you were in the forest?

They did not give us any of such things but they gave other girls dates and other substances which turned down their senses and made them like remote control in the hands of the insurgents. It makes them forget their parents and any other thing but they will be obsessed with killings only.

What message do you have for the Federal Government?

I don’t have any message other than to pray for the escape of the rest of the abducted girls.

LEADERSHIP

Court Orders Worldwide Freeze Of $1.8 Billion In Assets Stolen By Kola Aluko, Jide Omikore & Atlantic Energy

A federal high court in Lagos has granted a Mareva injunction permitting the Nigerian government to freeze assets owned by two Nigerian businessmen Kola Aluko and Jide Omokore, and their company Atlantic Energy. The individuals are linked to former Nigerian oil minister, Diezani Alison-Madueke in a wide range shady business dealings that illegally transferred Nigerian oil assets to them and their companies.

Federal high court in Lagos has granted a Mareva injunction permitting the Nigerian government to freeze assets owned by two Nigerian businessmen Kola Aluko and Jide Omokore, and their company Atlantic Energy. The individuals are linked to former Nigerian oil minister, Diezani Alison-Madueke in a wide range shady business dealings that illegally transferred Nigerian oil assets to them and their companies.

The legal documents, exclusively obtained by SaharaReporters, demanded a global freeze of $1.8 billion in assets stolen by Atlantic Energy executives Kola Aluko and Jide Omokore. This development follows reports that Mr. Aluko sold his lavish Bel-Air mansion in Los Angeles, USA at a $2 million loss. Mr. Omikore has also been under intense scrutiny by the Economic and Financial Crimes Commission (EFCC), which seized a 2 million pound wristwatch from him on April 27th, 2016 and raided his Nigerian homes on October 2nd, 2015.

Atlantic Energy was granted enormous contracts from the Nigerian Petroleum Development Company (NPDC) under the direction of the embattled former Minister for Petroleum Resources Madueke. According to reports, when Mrs. Madueke granted Atlantic Energy contracts through the Strategic Alliance Agreements (SAA) the company did not even legally exist.

According to legal documents, Mr. Aluko and Mr. Omikore stole more than $1.7 billion from the Nigerian government.

Assets specifically mentioned include three mansions in Los Angeles, two high-end apartments in New York City, properties in Santa Barbara, California; numerous properties in Lagos including 43 apartments in Banana Island, 58 vehicles, the Galactica Star yacht, and three airplanes.

-SR

Exposed: Shady&Highly Corruption in Nigeria’s Oil Deals 42 :NEITI audit uncovers N2.23trillion lost, unremitted revenues by NNPC in 2013

NEITI audit uncovers N2.23trillion lost, unremitted revenues by NNPC in 2013

The long-awaited Nigeria oil and gas as well as the solid minerals sectors 2013 audit reports by the Nigerian Extractive Industries Transparency Initiative, NEITI, was officially unveiled in Abuja on Monday.
The Minister of Solid Minerals and Chairman, NEITI Board, Kayode Fayemi, who unveiled the report, said the document contained damning revelations about revenues either lost or unremitted by the Nigerian National Petroleum Corporation and its sub-units
About N1.12 trillion, consisting $3.8billion (about N756.2 billion) and N358.3billion, was outstanding revenues from NNPC as unpaid royalties from the divested oil mining leases, OMLs.
The amount also covered cash call refunds from the National Petroleum Investment Management Services, and the Nigerian Petroleum Development Company, and crude liftings from Nigerian Agip Oil Company joint venture.
The report said N1.21 trillion, consisting $5.966billion (about N1.19 trillion) and N20.4 billion, were revenue losses to the Federation due to Offshore Processing Agreement, crude swap, and crude theft during the year.
Besides, the report said about $599.98million(about N119.4 billion) was unrealised revenue in the federation account as a result of under-assessments/under-payments of petroleum profit taxes, PPT and royalties by oil and gas companies due to the use of different pricing methodology by government and the companies due to the absence of a new fiscal regime.
Presenting the report, Mr. Fayemi said total revenue flow to the federation account from all oil and gas sources in 2013 was $58.07billion, which represented eight per cent decline when compared with the $62.9 billion realized in 2012, while total revenue from the solid minerals sector was N33.86 billion.
The decline in oil and gas revenues was attributed to the drop in sales following divestment of federation equity in some oil mining leases, OMLs, crude oil losses as a result of destruction of oil production facilities, pipelines vandalism and crude oil theft.

The report, which also gave total crude oil production during the year as 800.5 million barrels, revealed that total volume of crude oil lifted through the different contract arrangements was 800.34 million barrels.
While urging government to stop granting pioneer status to companies in the oil and gas sector, except those actually pioneering an aspect of the industry, the report called for a comprehensive investigation into the divestments of federation assets by NNPC to NPDC.
Details of the outstanding revenues against NNPC include about $1.7 billion (about N338.3 billion) in respect of the eight oil mining leases, OMLs acquired from NNPC/Shell Petroleum Development Company joint venture between 2010 and 2011 by the Nigerian Petroleum Development Company.
The report revealed that consideration for the OMLs (4, 26, 30, 34, 38, 40, 41 and 42) computed by the Department of Petroleum Resources was undervalued.
Despite an offer of $1.8 billion (N358.2 billion) for the assets, the report said no amount was paid, apart from  $100 million (N19.9 billion) paid in April 2014.
Regardless, it said the 2014 forensic audit report by PriceWaterhouseCoopers, PWC on the estimated value of NNPC’s 55 per cent equity transferred to the NPDC was put at about $3.4 billion (about N676.6 billion).
Another $414,000 (about N82.4 million) and N249.2million were also recorded as outstanding cash call refund on OML 26 in the NNPC/SPDC divested asset; N2.17billion outstanding cash call refund on OML 42 divested by the NNPC/SPDC, and $763.41million (about N151.92 billion) in respect of crude oil liftings by NPDC from the Nigerian Agip Oil Company.
Besides, $33.21million (about N6.61 billion) was also outstanding in respect of NPDC crude oil liftings from SPDC JV, while $1.74million (about N346.3 million) was also pending as balance of refund from crude oil lifting in the Mobil Producing Nigeria traced to NPDC Account.
About N351.87billion was captured in the report as unpaid domestic crude debt as at December 2013 after considering subsidy approved by the Petroleum Products Pricing Regulatory Agency, in addition to N3.98billion over recovery under  the Petroleum Support Fund (PSF).
About $1.29billion (N256.71 billion) was found as unremitted dividends by the Nigeria LNG for 2013.
“The receipt of NLNG payments of dividends, loan and interest repayments for 2013 was confirmed by NNPC, but could not be traced to the Federation Account,” the report said.
“There was non- remittance of NLNG dividends, interest and loan repayment in the sum of $1.289 Billion in 2013.
“This brings the total outstanding dividends paid by NLNG to NNPC, which has not been accounted for by NNPC from 2005 to 2013 to $12.92 billion.”
On revenue losses to the federation account during the year, the report showed that about $1.17 million (about N232.8 million) was lost by the Crude Oil Marketing Department (COMD) of the NNPC for exchange loss for pricing domestic gas in dollars, invoicing in Naira, while payment was made in dollars.

The COMD also lost $20.43million (about N4.07 billion) for pricing methodology on domestic crude oil lifted by the NNPC as well as another $439.72 million (about N87.5 billion) as a result of unexplained differences in crude oil export by under-reporting revenue received.
Similarly, another NNPC subsidiary – Pipelines and Products Marketing Company, PPMC – incurred losses of $518.05 million (about N103.09billion) from Offshore Processing Arrangement (OPA) and Crude for Product Swap arrangement during the year.
The report also disclosed that N13.42 billion was lost by NNPC through non-compliance with the 90 days credit limit set time value of money by the Central Bank of Nigeria, which attracts 12 per cent interest rate.
According to the document, another N4.74billion was also lost through NNPC’s share of crude oil losses due to theft and sabotage from NAOC; Chevron Nigeria Limited, and SPDC JVs (production facilities to terminal).

To Be Fair to Fayose… By Pius Adesanmi.

1) He does not have the resources of Lagos. It is not fair to ridicule his dane guns vis-a-vis Ambode’s sophisticated weaponry in Lagos. If a man is going to heaven and puts on his shoes, it is no longer fair to say that his feet are not yet off the ground.
2) The man arranging sophisticated 21st-century equipment for the police in Lagos and the man mobilizing the dane guns of a local hunters’ guild in Ekiti on an “awon tia” level are to be engaged equally as an indictment of the Nigerian state. Because security is mostly federalized on the basis of Nigeria’s mockery of Federalism, it is not really in their place to be equipping the police or traditional hunters.
3) With her monopoly of the apparatuses of violence, security, and power such as the police, the military, etc, security is the primary responsibility of the Nigerian state. If you refuse to allow state police and insist on exercising a monopoly over security in an overbearing unitary structure masquerading as federalism, it is your responsibility to equip your federal police and position them to be able to provide adequate security for every Nigerian. If your motherhood cred is not up to scratch, you do not hail the akara hawker. This also underscores the absurdity of our security vote thingy. So much awoof money in the hands of Governors who have no power over the police!
4) What Ambode and Fayose are doing is making up for the demission and the failures of the centre. They are also making up for the tragic politicization of security by the centre. If you monopolize security in a unitary arrangement and you allow the perception to fester that some security challenges are more deserving of robust responses (apologies to COZA) than others, those you have left to their own devices must exercise their right to survival and self-preservation. It can take the shape of 21st-century scenarios like what we see in Lagos or the 17th-century Akara Ogun scenarios we see in Ekiti.
5) Nigeria being Nigeria, the desperate circumstances that have forced Ekiti and Lagos to move in to fill the shoes of a failed and absent centre on the security front trump other questions that are necessary in a democracy. To the extent that these two Governors may in fact save some lives with the security palliatives they have offered, it is now no longer expedient to ask the questions we must ask about what it has cost the tax payers of Lagos and Ekiti to make up for the failures of the centre. I’m sure that if you hear what Ambode will claim to have paid for his modern equipment or what Fayose will claim to have paid for his facilitation of dane guns, a promised pickup truck, and the obligatory stomach infrastructure for the hunters, you will have a heart attack. Because this is Nigeria, we are left with “they sha even tried. What about those who are just chopping the security vote without even trying?”
6) Fayose for once has done something that allows us to deepen our discourse on how to sustain our struggle for genuine federalism. You have to look beyond his agbero theatrics to understand his contribution here. Even in the best case scenarios of presidential federalism such as what operates in the United States, there is never such thing as a finished federalist state because a nation is a permanent plebiscite, to be constantly negotiated, challenged and renegotiated. A nation-state is by definition a permanently unfinished political entity. That is why states in the United States are always pushing the boundaries, testing the waters, dragging Obama to the Supreme court for interpretations of the limits of Federal power, forming vigilantes to patrol borders, encroaching on the powers and duties of the centre, taking over federal buildings, etc. Some of these scenarios are legal, some obviously aren’t but the bottomline is that they are enabled by an underlying philosophy of the unfinishedness of the nation-state.
7) In Nigeria, generation after generation of political elite have sold the error that the Nigerian state is a finished product. This is the historical anachronism they sell when they convene national conferences and decree “no-go” areas or when they mouth jejune platitudes such as “the corporate existence of Nigeria is not negotiable.” Not negotiable? Now, where did they get that from? Even the best federalist scenarios such as I have sketched out in number six above are negotiable and are constantly challenged and negotiated. You ram a dysfunctional unitary system down a people’s throat, fail to guarantee security, or guarantee security selectively, and turn around to think that there will not be Fayoses in this world to challenge that arrangement and propose their own desperate, localized solutions to your failures?
8) I agree that Fayose did the right thing the wrong way. He ought to have gone to his State House of Assembly to get requisite laws passed and proceed from there instead of going to rouse people to respond to murder with jungle justice and extra-judicial killings. But that would be judging a fish by its ability to fly. The “awon tia, alagbo jedi and alamala” approach is the only approach he knows. That is all he has to offer. It was the responsibility of his handlers to have been equal to the task in terms of how to package him for a 21st-century approach to the matter. Had it been handled better, the entire process would have been articulated as the right of Ekiti people to survival, self-preservation, and self-defense in the face of the Nigerian state’s refusal, unwillingness or inability to guarantee these things. Ekiti is within her right to do this and Fayose’s handlers should have opted for that optics. But, then, it was these same handlers who allowed him to address a mall from behind a wooden podium in China! They too cannot give what they do not have.
9) We must also warn Uncle Fayose that dane guns, stomach infrastructure, and one van are no match for the AK-47s and sophisticated weaponry of the herdsmen. Things work in mysterious ways in Nigeria. Thus, the nomadic herdsmen appear to be better funded and equipped than the police in many states. Uncle Fayose may be sending his Akara Ogun contingent to certain death with his rousing speech. However, I fully understand the desperation behind these measures in the affected states.
10) Until we find a solution to our unitary incubus, I am afraid the most effective remedy remains keeping the pressure on the presidency to value and secure the life of EVERY NIGERIAN.
Footnote:
Do they still teach idiomatic expressions such as “(like) water off a duck’s back in our schools?” On Femi Adesina’s matter: e je ma “kpa” ara yin! Me and all my personal people are sharing banter and laffs over it while many of you are bursting a vein, thinking you are mocking me. Go and sempe fa.

How Nigerian Petrol Attendants Cheat You In Filling Stations – By Daramola Babalola

The rise in the price of petrol from ₦86.50/L to ₦145 Naira/L last week has continued to have a heavy toll on Nigerians, while many are taking to the street to protest the fuel hike, others are getting used to the excruciating fact that a litre of petrol now costs ₦145 Naira.

Sadly, as if the skyrocketing price of petrol isn’t enough, the ‘friendly’ fuel station attendants have found numerous tricks to add to their regular income, and undercut the customers who at the first place are paying through their noses.

The nefarious activity perpetrated by petrol attendants nationwide has gone unnoticed by many motorists as they drive into the filling stations to fill their tanks.

Fuel Station scams are not something new. There are plenty of foul plays which can leave you cheated at a fuel station.

Why do the petrol attendants cheat you?

First of all, the petrol attendants in Nigeria are one of the least paid in the country, infact an average petrol attendant is paid between ₦10,000 – ₦15,000 monthly, but a smart attendant can make his salary in one day by cheating customers.

Ideally, when a petrol attendant resumes for work, he/she takes the reading on the meter on the fuel dispenser, which they call The Opening Meter, and after they close for the day, the reading on the meter, called The Closing Meter is taken by the attendant. Then, they multiply the difference in the readings by the cost per litre, which is the amount they deliver to the manager. If there is any surplus cash, the attendant takes it.

Unfortunately, the surplus money is simply a product of manipulation/cheating of petrol buyers by the fuel attendants on a daily basis.

How Nigerian Petrol Attendants Cheat Customers In Filling Stations

I have compiled a list of some of the most common dirty tactics which are used to cheat customers at Nigerian fuel stations based on my research and conversation with some petrol attendants across the country.

TRICK 1: Recall or TIM/CAL button

On the fuel dispenser there is usually a button labelled ‘Recall, TIM/CAL’ or any other label, depending on the machine. The essence of the button is to enable the attendant to see the past sales.
If you want to see your last ten sales, you just press Recall, then the number you want to see etc, depending on the number you want, and it shows you the amount.

Beyond seeing past sales,petrol attendants use it to cheat and make money from the customers.

For example, if a petrol attendant sold ₦5,000 worth of fuel to (Customer A), and the next customer (Customer B) also wants to buy ₦5,000., the attendant will clear the screen to ₦00.0 and tell Customer B to look at it (A way of gaining your trust and making you relax) then when they observe that the second customer (Customer B) Isn’t paying attention, they will sell some quantity, like ₦3,500 for example and press Stop or Cancel, depending on the machine, then press Recall 1, and Ok,With that, ₦5,000 will appear on the screen and that is what the customer will see on the meter, believing the sale is complete, meanwhile the attendant recalled the previous sale.

My investigations revealed that this can be done in less than one second.

Infact, some attendants could go to the extent of writing out some past sales on a paper where they can easily have a glance to know which number to recall when a customer is distracted or looks away, since many people prefer to buy based on price and not litre.

For example Recall 1 can be ₦5,000, Recall 2 – ₦3,000, Recall 3 – ₦2,000, so based on the customer they want to cheat, they look at the paper to recall, and the customers would think the machine was fast, so they wouldn’t always suspect anything

TRICK 2: Fake hang the nozzle

Almost every petrol consumer is knowledgeable that when the nozzle is hanged on the pump, the readings revert to zero. Thus the fuel attendants have also found a way to manipulate it to make some money for their pockets.

What they do is that they gently hang the nozzle, such that it won’t click to rub off the old sales and revert to zero, so,they fake hang the nozzle,while the dispenser is still running, so if a new customer comes, they simply continue from where they stopped from the previous customer.

This trick is used a lot during fuel scarcity, or when customers are in a hurry to buy fuel.

This trick is also easier for the fuel attendant if the last sale was in a small quantity.

TRICK 3: The Okada/Keke Napep advantage

Most times, the Okada and Keke Napep’s tend to buy petrol in small quantities, for example like 2 or 3 Litres of fuel.

After dispensing fuel for the Okada/Keke Napep, if the next buyer intends to buy fuel in his car or a big jerry can, the fuel attendant will use the Okada/Keke Napep advantage, because of the small quantity sold previously and continue to dispense fuel into your car tank without clearing the previous sale.

For example, if the previous sale to an Okada, Keke Napep or even a commercial bus is about ₦350, the fuel attendant will gently place the nozzle, and naturally, when the next customer (The Car owner) sees that the attendant removed the nozzle from the dispensing machine, he believes that it started from zero. However, it is not always the case, thus the car owner is automatically cheated by ₦350.

TRICK 4: The Fill up your tank system

A report culled from dailyfinance.com says filling up the tank may be another way to lose money and fuel, because when the pump clicks off automatically, no additional fuel enters the tank. “Instead, fuel is likely being diverted through the pump’s vapour recovery system and back into the station’s tank, which means you are paying for petrol that you are not getting.

“More importantly, the car needs space in its tank for fuel vapours to expand. Overfilling can force gas into the car’s carbon filter, leading to poor performance, reduced mileage or costly repairs. So, the next time you want to buy fuel, don’t top off your tank, it’s good for your car and even better for your wallet,” the report said.

TRICK 5: The faulty meter
Some petrol pumps have rigged meters that start ticking even before petrol starts to flow from the hose. Have you ever gone to a filling station to buy fuel and it takes lesser time to fill your tank, compared to other places? This is as a result of the meters that have been tampered with, the attendant will make you believe the particular fuel dispenser is faster or slower than normal, depending on how the meters were manipulated.

Nigeria’s petroleum regulator, Department of Petroleum Resources, DPR,saddled with the responsibility of regulating, monitoring and enforcing the laws in the sector, used the Seraphin Can to expose filling stations involved in the nefarious act in Lagos recently.

The ten-liter Seraphin Can is used by the DPR to ascertain the exact dispensing meter measurement of filling stations. When filled to the level of ten liters, dispensing meters that have been adjusted will show above ten liters on the display board. When this occurs, the filling station is shut by DPR officials.

DPR said over 500 filling stations had been shut for under-dispensing and other related offences.

TRICK 6: Using Unnecessarily Longer Dispenser Pipe

Pumps save on a lot of petrol when they use long pipes.

A perfectly good meter will show that a certain amount of petrol has been pumped out, but that amount hasn’t reached your tank — some of it is still in the pipe, and it goes back into the pump. Through the day, the number of litres that stations save can be enormous, making the attendant accumulate surplus cash from undispensed fuel.

TRICK 7: Get friendly, distract and cheat
How many times have you visited the filling station and you notice that the fuel attendant is trying to chat you up. If he is not talking about the government, religion or politics, he is most likely to dive into football, especially if he noticed you are a fan of a particular club.
‘Oga mi up Arsenal o, me i be Barcelona fan, we go beat Arsenal all the time’
The trick is to make you get very comfortable, argue with him and take your eyes off the fuel meter.
Sometimes the attendant can even get his colleague to distract you, so he can focus on fuel pump to cheat you.

He can ask you questions like..
‘Sir/madam do you need engine oil’ or ‘Sir you need to balance your wheels’

TRICK 8: Pretend not to hear you, fake ignorance, smile, apologize

This is another trick used by fuel attendants, when you request to fill up your car or
jerrycan for a particular amount, for example ₦4000, the attendant will sell only ₦1000 worth of fuel, when you ask him why he didn’t fill up for ₦4000, the attendant will apologize and smile innocently and say that he/she heard you say you wanted to buy ₦1000 worth of fuel, and thus pretend to continue filling the remaining ₦3000, by pretending to reset the meter and fill up your ₦4000 worth of petrol and so you pay ₦4000

But the attendant just cheated you, and this is how…

He did not reset the meter to ₦0.00 , he continued from the ₦1000 point till he got to ₦3000, so in reality you only get the petrol worth ₦3000, but pay ₦4000

TRICK 9: Intervening the Dispenser Nozzle

It is generally found that the pump attendants keep their fingers tight on the nozzle and interrupt the flow of fuel manually. In this way, the required amount of fuel gets short. With these type of tricks, the pump staff saves probably litres of oil in a single day that accumulates to his personal surplus profit for the day.

TRICK 10: Fuel Adulteration
The simplest and the most effective way of cheating used by almost all the petrol pumps is the adulteration of fuel. Usually, the dealers chemically adulterate the petrol by adding Naphtha, which is a byproduct and is as dense as petrol. It does not leave residue and is cheaper than its counterpart.

TRICK 11: Two sides of price indicators
In this particular trick, manipulations are done by pump attendants who normally strike when motorists are preoccupied with other thoughts. Most times, pump attendants are so daring.

Motorists should be more careful with pumps that have two sides of price indicators—back and forth screen, displaying amount of money dispensed.

For several reasons, some of which are technical, each side of the screen could show a different price. For example, ₦5000 and the other screen could display about ₦4000.

If you requested to buy fuel worth ₦5000 and the a buyer from other side of the pump is also buying ₦5000 worth of fuel, if you are not watching close enough, a crafty attendant can dispense fuel worth ₦4000 and point to the other side pump, hoodwinking you into believing that he/she has dispensed the amount you required, meanwhile you have lost ₦1000 as the price indicator was for the other pump.

Now to counter these 11 tricks above, here are some of the counter-tricks or precautions to cut the cheating attendants

Always, get off from your car, lock the vehicle and stand close to petrol tank and see the meter readings when buying fuel

Check the meter reading after opening the petrol tank or before fueling starts and again at the very end.

Keep a continuous watch at the meter reading and at the fueling person, throughout your turn.
If you develop doubt over a particular petrol pump, then AVOID that particular petrol pump in the future like the plague. I have also seen that there are petrol pumps which do not indulge in such activities. Identify such pumps and try to fill from these pumps only

In any case, don’t believe the attendants and NEVER EVER TAKE YOUR EYES FROM THE METER. Get it set to zero and do not take your eyes off till the last drop comes out of the nozzle
Ask the attendant firmly to keep his hands off the nozzle and wait for the auto cut-off to kick-in.

Park the car a bit away from the machine and let the attendant stretch the pipe to your fuel lid. Ask him to hold the nozzle at certain height post he is done fueling up the tank in order to allow the residual to flow in

Always check for zero before they start filling, even if the petrol pump is overcrowded.
Reduce conversations with the fuel attaendant, and if you must talk to him/her, please do it without taking your eyes off the meter for one second. Also make sure the meter is set at ₦0.00 before the attendants starts to fill up your tank/keg.

Do not take your eyes off the meter till the last drop, don’t get distracted by counting the money you want to give him/her, wait till he/she is done dispensing the fuel.

End the transaction right there, in case the meter is stopped for any reason.

Do not hurry and always pay at the end of the transaction.

Ask for a printed receipt every time, as far as possible.

Always keep a watch on the attendant and on the meter. If you are suspicious about a certain fuel station, step out of your car and ask the attendant to move away from the dispenser while filling. If you still feel that he is cheating stop him from filling your tank and call the manager and lodge your complain. If nobody at the station admits their fraud or deny any assistance, reach out to DPR

FREEDAY FREE FOOD FOR FRIENDS’ FREAKING FREETHINKING Vols 376 , 377, 378 , 379 , 380 and 381 +Buhari vs Senate/NASS +Scissors Couple+Which way Nigeria:1 year of Buhari govt+Chibok girls kidnap isnt a scam but reality+How petrol attendants cheat customers+Remembering some sweet scenes of my childhood

FREEDAY FREE FOOD FOR FRIENDS’ FREAKING FREETHINKING Vol 376

Buhari vs Senate/NASS : My opinion

Many close observers would have noticed recently that despite my very vociferous and fanatical support for President. Buhari, I’ve been silent on few issues especially the Occupy Senate / National Assembly (NASS) movement. That appears strange. Isn’t it. I see myself as one of the most (if not the most ) fanatical and vociferous Buhari supporters. I still remain one because I haven’t backslidden from that. However I’m a reasonable and thinking supporter, not a blind supporter.

Inasmuchas I’m not condemning the Occupy NASS movement but see the patrotism and zeal in some of their actions, I’ve decided to stay aloof. However, there is a latent danger it could achieve giving stupid publicity to the next generation of Dino Melayes and initial campaigners of #IStandWithBuhari (now condemned by the presidency). I don’t believe in projects that will make noise but not bring much/intended results most especially when there are easier and more effective ways to achieve such goals. I still remember Occupy Nigeria and how the labour sabotaged our efforts at the most critical stage.

I don’t pity President. Buhari at all. In fact I laugh at him and mock him. Let him stew in his vomit and reap the work of his hands and fruits of his foolishness and naïvety. If he had been serious, Bukola Saraki wouldn’t have been Senate President. He would have had his own men in charge of the Senate and National Assembly and the legislative bodies would have followed his policy direction without being an unnecessary rubber stamp. He sat and did nothing till Saraki emerged and started “Kwaralizing” the national assembly. Obasanjo did not allow the Senate to run like a goat or headless chicken, he pushed his agenda. One year is almost gone from this administration if the President is still unable to learn anything from this, then he needs to change his political advisers.
Despite GEJ’s seeming weakness,he was seriously interested in who became the senate president when he held forth in Aso Rock.If Buhari is serious, everyone else will get in line or ship out.

I said it from day one that PMB was being unrealistic by saying that he belonged to everybody and to nobody. Body language is not enough for a president that wants to sanitize the system. Let the world know your interest. When people like us were warning him of impending foolishness in saying ” I belong to nobody, I belong to everybody, I won’t involve myself in senate/ National Assembly (NASS )leadership “,he didn’t listen. I said then that’s the most foolish move. Governance must be mixed with politics. His handlers refused to tell him the truth. Some even lied that Tinubu was trying to gain control of NASS/Senate to blackmail him. Which is better: to be under Tinubu’s attack or Saraki’s ? Tinubu remains an indefatigable loyalist of Buhari (talk for another day). Telling the public he is not going to be involved in who becomes the Senate President/NASS leadership wasn’t a smart move. Nostra II warned him seriously but he failed to heed. Let his stew in his vomit.

I have a piece of advice for Buhari, he should stop this gentle man politics. I have four suggestions for him. I’m gonna make one public (free) and the rest three I can be contacted by any of his advisers for a professional fee { I offered free advice in the past which were ignored but the free advice offered here is still enough if he’s serious to implement it }.

Politics is always a game of strategy and numbers; and majority will always carry the day even if it’s only by a vote. Loyalty and putting your team in order with the right strategy is very important. After Saraki might have been put to where he belongs, get some senators loyal to Saraki arrested on the day of election and allow smooth election of new senate president. By doing so, heavens will not fall. That is called ” Roforofo politics ” { dirty mud politics }

Additional Credits : Oyewole K Akinsola
Olugbenga Olayiwole

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

FREEDAY FREE FOOD FOR FRIENDS’ FREAKING FREETHINKING Vol 377

SCISSORS COUPLES –
I believe this is good and it will be very instructive and interesting as well. I just read it and I found it to be good. Enjoy it as well and have a great weekend. God bless.

SCISSORS COUPLES: I needed to use the scissors this morning& as I finished with it. I looked at it carefully & I see that, the scissors models an ideal couple. Let’s see some lessons every couple should learn from the scissors so that we can become better couples& build enviable homes.
LESSON 1. The scissors is always in pairs& that’s where its usefulness is. Once you see one part& the other part is not there, it is useless no matter how beautiful it is. The effectiveness of every marriage is lost when couples are not together. Separation & divorce destroy the effectiveness& usefulness of every marriage. Remember, ‘united we stand, divided we fall’. Separation is not only when you separate physically & you are no longer living together. There are many couples who are together under the same roof but are spiritually, emotionally, sexually, financially, socially, etc separated. Are you sure you& your spouse are not separated in one of these ways?

LESSON 2: The togetherness of scissors is not automatic. There is a small bolt or pin that fixed the scissors together in the middle. In the same vein, if couples must be bounded together like this scissors, there must be ‘bolts’ that must fixed& wed them together that will make them inseparable.

Some of the ‘bolts’ are
√The presence of God
√ openness& trust
√ Unity
√ Healthy& joyful sex life
√ family vision
√ good family finance
√ hot family altar, etc.
I tried separating this scissors this morning, but the pin was so deep & tight into it that it was not easy for me to separate them.

LESSON 3: The scissors is useless except someone holds it. Couples can’t be effective except they allow God to hold them and use them to achieve their marital destiny. No family is really useless. It is either you are positively useful& that happens when it is God holding the two of you. You will be negatively useful when it is the devil holding the two of you. The devil can hold the two of you and use you to destroy each other,and destroy the future of your children & even destroy your eternity. Ask yourself as couples. Who is holding us& holding our family.?
LESSON 4: Each pair of the scissors has a sharp part& a dull part. The face is sharp while the back is dull. In the same vein, each couple has his/ her area of strengths & weaknesses. Your spouse is not empty. Though you might see the ‘dull part’ of your spouse, but if you want your marriage to accomplish its purpose; you must recognise the ‘sharp part’ of your spouse. You also must display your ‘sharp part’ ( strengths). Don’t just display your ‘dull part’. That destroys marriage fast!.

LESSON 5: Synergy in working: The two pairs must come together before it can cut whatever you want to use it to cut. Each pair will bring its sharpness& join it with the sharpness of the other pair& cutting will be done easily& smoothly. In like manner, synergy is the energy of any family. All these, my money, my car,my own, my thing, me, mine, myself syndromes will sap away the energy of your marriage. Synergize your resources, money, connection, visions as couples so as to give energy to your marriage to advance it to the next level. ‘Iness’ is the mother of illness of marriage while ‘WEness’ is the mother of wellness of every marriage. You want energy for your marriage?, then go for synergy.

Only ‘SCISSORS COUPLES’ are SERIOUS COUPLES. You can share to bless a family. The joy of your family is my priority.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

FREEDAY FREE FOOD FOR FRIENDS’ FREAKING FREETHINKING Vol  378

Which Way Nigeria ?

1 year ago : Hopes were high. Buhari the magician and miracle worker has been sworn in. Within an instant, he’ll turn water into wine , transform Nigeria into another Dubai / London, jail all corrupt people, impregnate all barren women, heal the sick, raise the dead, bring snow into Nigeria, give Nigeria 24hrs uninterrupted electricity, make food prices and commodities cheap, transform and CHANGE Nigeria’s economy, 4 refineries will be built in the twinkle of an eye, petrol will be #45/L and it’ll be #1 to $1, interest rates will be cheap and money will flow on the streets. He’ll turn rainfall into naira fall. He’ll feed and pay all unemployed people, even the lazy ones. CHANGE is here !

1 year later (now present reality ):
Dashed hopes, failed promises (at it seems), hopeless realities, hyperinflation, scare food commodities, $1 = #320 ; fuel #145 / L.
I know many Nigerians now understand what the Bible said in Prov 13 v 12 ” Hope deferred make the heart sick ” ( ireti pipe maa n mu okan saare ). It shall be well with Nigeria.

NB: I hope the #WailingWailers (#AwonElekunGbere ) are now happy their prayers for Nigeria and Buhari to fail (as it seems ) have been answered. I have 2 things for them. Let them remember they too are heavily affected be it Nigeria is good or bad. Why not pray for good of Nigeria&PMB ? ” Oorun n yabo kii s’eru enikan ” { Don’t say let the heavens fall bcos if it does, you too will be affected }. I have also a middle finger for the wailers.
One thing however that I’m sure of is that it could have been much worse than this if the so called transformation agenda and putrified fresh air had continued.
God bless Nigeria !

 

 

 

 

 

FREEDAY FREE FOOD FOR FRIENDS’ FREAKING FREETHINKING Vol  379

CHIBOK GIRLS’ KIDNAP ISN’T A SCAM BUT A REALITY

They claimed Chibok girls kidnap was a scam and stage managed to embarass govt about 2 years ago when GEJ was in power, yet same GEJ set up a committee who found out it was true and wasn’t a scam.
GEJ despite surrounding himself with his kinsmen as heads of all relevant security agencies in Nigeria couldn’t unravel it.
Director-General, DSS Ita Ekpeyong is from the SS
COAS Lt-Gen Kenneth Minimah is Ijaw by tribe also from the SS
DG DMI ( Directorate of Military intelligence) Brigadier Basil Azuike is from the SE
YET THEY COULDN’T UNRAVEL THE SCAM
A total of 58 girls escaped at different times and related the fact they were kidnaped, yet some deluded folks said it was scam. One was released after arrest as a suicide bomber in Cameroon, yet they refused to believe.
Two have been recovered in the last 2 days, yet still re

fuse to believe, yet pictures don’t lie.
Shame on those who still say the Chibok issue was scam.

Michael DrBiggie Adeyemi's photo.

 FREEDAY FREE FOOD FOR FRIENDS’ FREAKING FREETHINKING Vol  380

How Nigerian Petrol Attendants Cheat You In Filling Stations – By Daramola Babalola

The rise in the price of petrol from ₦86.50/L to ₦145 Naira/L last week has continued to have a heavy toll on Nigerians, while many are taking to the street to protest the fuel hike, others are getting used to the excruciating fact that a litre of petrol now costs ₦145 Naira.

Sadly, as if the skyrocketing price of petrol isn’t enough, the ‘friendly’ fuel station attendants have found numerous tricks to add to their regular income, and undercut the customers who at the first place are paying through their noses.

The nefarious activity perpetrated by petrol attendants nationwide has gone unnoticed by many motorists as they drive into the filling stations to fill their tanks.

Fuel Station scams are not something new. There are plenty of foul plays which can leave you cheated at a fuel station.

Why do the petrol attendants cheat you?

First of all, the petrol attendants in Nigeria are one of the least paid in the country, infact an average petrol attendant is paid between ₦10,000 – ₦15,000 monthly, but a smart attendant can make his salary in one day by cheating customers.

Ideally, when a petrol attendant resumes for work, he/she takes the reading on the meter on the fuel dispenser, which they call The Opening Meter, and after they close for the day, the reading on the meter, called The Closing Meter is taken by the attendant. Then, they multiply the difference in the readings by the cost per litre, which is the amount they deliver to the manager. If there is any surplus cash, the attendant takes it.

Unfortunately, the surplus money is simply a product of manipulation/cheating of petrol buyers by the fuel attendants on a daily basis.

How Nigerian Petrol Attendants Cheat Customers In Filling Stations

I have compiled a list of some of the most common dirty tactics which are used to cheat customers at Nigerian fuel stations based on my research and conversation with some petrol attendants across the country.

TRICK 1: Recall or TIM/CAL button

On the fuel dispenser there is usually a button labelled ‘Recall, TIM/CAL’ or any other label, depending on the machine. The essence of the button is to enable the attendant to see the past sales.
If you want to see your last ten sales, you just press Recall, then the number you want to see etc, depending on the number you want, and it shows you the amount.

Beyond seeing past sales,petrol attendants use it to cheat and make money from the customers.

For example, if a petrol attendant sold ₦5,000 worth of fuel to (Customer A), and the next customer (Customer B) also wants to buy ₦5,000., the attendant will clear the screen to ₦00.0 and tell Customer B to look at it (A way of gaining your trust and making you relax) then when they observe that the second customer (Customer B) Isn’t paying attention, they will sell some quantity, like ₦3,500 for example and press Stop or Cancel, depending on the machine, then press Recall 1, and Ok,With that, ₦5,000 will appear on the screen and that is what the customer will see on the meter, believing the sale is complete, meanwhile the attendant recalled the previous sale.

My investigations revealed that this can be done in less than one second.

Infact, some attendants could go to the extent of writing out some past sales on a paper where they can easily have a glance to know which number to recall when a customer is distracted or looks away, since many people prefer to buy based on price and not litre.

For example Recall 1 can be ₦5,000, Recall 2 – ₦3,000, Recall 3 – ₦2,000, so based on the customer they want to cheat, they look at the paper to recall, and the customers would think the machine was fast, so they wouldn’t always suspect anything

TRICK 2: Fake hang the nozzle

Almost every petrol consumer is knowledgeable that when the nozzle is hanged on the pump, the readings revert to zero. Thus the fuel attendants have also found a way to manipulate it to make some money for their pockets.

What they do is that they gently hang the nozzle, such that it won’t click to rub off the old sales and revert to zero, so,they fake hang the nozzle,while the dispenser is still running, so if a new customer comes, they simply continue from where they stopped from the previous customer.

This trick is used a lot during fuel scarcity, or when customers are in a hurry to buy fuel.

This trick is also easier for the fuel attendant if the last sale was in a small quantity.

TRICK 3: The Okada/Keke Napep advantage

Most times, the Okada and Keke Napep’s tend to buy petrol in small quantities, for example like 2 or 3 Litres of fuel.

After dispensing fuel for the Okada/Keke Napep, if the next buyer intends to buy fuel in his car or a big jerry can, the fuel attendant will use the Okada/Keke Napep advantage, because of the small quantity sold previously and continue to dispense fuel into your car tank without clearing the previous sale.

For example, if the previous sale to an Okada, Keke Napep or even a commercial bus is about ₦350, the fuel attendant will gently place the nozzle, and naturally, when the next customer (The Car owner) sees that the attendant removed the nozzle from the dispensing machine, he believes that it started from zero. However, it is not always the case, thus the car owner is automatically cheated by ₦350.

TRICK 4: The Fill up your tank system

A report culled from dailyfinance.com says filling up the tank may be another way to lose money and fuel, because when the pump clicks off automatically, no additional fuel enters the tank. “Instead, fuel is likely being diverted through the pump’s vapour recovery system and back into the station’s tank, which means you are paying for petrol that you are not getting.

“More importantly, the car needs space in its tank for fuel vapours to expand. Overfilling can force gas into the car’s carbon filter, leading to poor performance, reduced mileage or costly repairs. So, the next time you want to buy fuel, don’t top off your tank, it’s good for your car and even better for your wallet,” the report said.

TRICK 5: The faulty meter
Some petrol pumps have rigged meters that start ticking even before petrol starts to flow from the hose. Have you ever gone to a filling station to buy fuel and it takes lesser time to fill your tank, compared to other places? This is as a result of the meters that have been tampered with, the attendant will make you believe the particular fuel dispenser is faster or slower than normal, depending on how the meters were manipulated.

Nigeria’s petroleum regulator, Department of Petroleum Resources, DPR,saddled with the responsibility of regulating, monitoring and enforcing the laws in the sector, used the Seraphin Can to expose filling stations involved in the nefarious act in Lagos recently.

The ten-liter Seraphin Can is used by the DPR to ascertain the exact dispensing meter measurement of filling stations. When filled to the level of ten liters, dispensing meters that have been adjusted will show above ten liters on the display board. When this occurs, the filling station is shut by DPR officials.

DPR said over 500 filling stations had been shut for under-dispensing and other related offences.

TRICK 6: Using Unnecessarily Longer Dispenser Pipe

Pumps save on a lot of petrol when they use long pipes.

A perfectly good meter will show that a certain amount of petrol has been pumped out, but that amount hasn’t reached your tank — some of it is still in the pipe, and it goes back into the pump. Through the day, the number of litres that stations save can be enormous, making the attendant accumulate surplus cash from undispensed fuel.

TRICK 7: Get friendly, distract and cheat
How many times have you visited the filling station and you notice that the fuel attendant is trying to chat you up. If he is not talking about the government, religion or politics, he is most likely to dive into football, especially if he noticed you are a fan of a particular club.
‘Oga mi up Arsenal o, me i be Barcelona fan, we go beat Arsenal all the time’
The trick is to make you get very comfortable, argue with him and take your eyes off the fuel meter.
Sometimes the attendant can even get his colleague to distract you, so he can focus on fuel pump to cheat you.

He can ask you questions like..
‘Sir/madam do you need engine oil’ or ‘Sir you need to balance your wheels’

TRICK 8: Pretend not to hear you, fake ignorance, smile, apologize

This is another trick used by fuel attendants, when you request to fill up your car or
jerrycan for a particular amount, for example ₦4000, the attendant will sell only ₦1000 worth of fuel, when you ask him why he didn’t fill up for ₦4000, the attendant will apologize and smile innocently and say that he/she heard you say you wanted to buy ₦1000 worth of fuel, and thus pretend to continue filling the remaining ₦3000, by pretending to reset the meter and fill up your ₦4000 worth of petrol and so you pay ₦4000

But the attendant just cheated you, and this is how…

He did not reset the meter to ₦0.00 , he continued from the ₦1000 point till he got to ₦3000, so in reality you only get the petrol worth ₦3000, but pay ₦4000

TRICK 9: Intervening the Dispenser Nozzle

It is generally found that the pump attendants keep their fingers tight on the nozzle and interrupt the flow of fuel manually. In this way, the required amount of fuel gets short. With these type of tricks, the pump staff saves probably litres of oil in a single day that accumulates to his personal surplus profit for the day.

TRICK 10: Fuel Adulteration
The simplest and the most effective way of cheating used by almost all the petrol pumps is the adulteration of fuel. Usually, the dealers chemically adulterate the petrol by adding Naphtha, which is a byproduct and is as dense as petrol. It does not leave residue and is cheaper than its counterpart.

TRICK 11: Two sides of price indicators
In this particular trick, manipulations are done by pump attendants who normally strike when motorists are preoccupied with other thoughts. Most times, pump attendants are so daring.

Motorists should be more careful with pumps that have two sides of price indicators—back and forth screen, displaying amount of money dispensed.

For several reasons, some of which are technical, each side of the screen could show a different price. For example, ₦5000 and the other screen could display about ₦4000.

If you requested to buy fuel worth ₦5000 and the a buyer from other side of the pump is also buying ₦5000 worth of fuel, if you are not watching close enough, a crafty attendant can dispense fuel worth ₦4000 and point to the other side pump, hoodwinking you into believing that he/she has dispensed the amount you required, meanwhile you have lost ₦1000 as the price indicator was for the other pump.

Now to counter these 11 tricks above, here are some of the counter-tricks or precautions to cut the cheating attendants

Always, get off from your car, lock the vehicle and stand close to petrol tank and see the meter readings when buying fuel

Check the meter reading after opening the petrol tank or before fueling starts and again at the very end.

Keep a continuous watch at the meter reading and at the fueling person, throughout your turn.
If you develop doubt over a particular petrol pump, then AVOID that particular petrol pump in the future like the plague. I have also seen that there are petrol pumps which do not indulge in such activities. Identify such pumps and try to fill from these pumps only

In any case, don’t believe the attendants and NEVER EVER TAKE YOUR EYES FROM THE METER. Get it set to zero and do not take your eyes off till the last drop comes out of the nozzle
Ask the attendant firmly to keep his hands off the nozzle and wait for the auto cut-off to kick-in.

Park the car a bit away from the machine and let the attendant stretch the pipe to your fuel lid. Ask him to hold the nozzle at certain height post he is done fueling up the tank in order to allow the residual to flow in

Always check for zero before they start filling, even if the petrol pump is overcrowded.
Reduce conversations with the fuel attaendant, and if you must talk to him/her, please do it without taking your eyes off the meter for one second. Also make sure the meter is set at ₦0.00 before the attendants starts to fill up your tank/keg.

Do not take your eyes off the meter till the last drop, don’t get distracted by counting the money you want to give him/her, wait till he/she is done dispensing the fuel.

End the transaction right there, in case the meter is stopped for any reason.

Do not hurry and always pay at the end of the transaction.

Ask for a printed receipt every time, as far as possible.

Always keep a watch on the attendant and on the meter. If you are suspicious about a certain fuel station, step out of your car and ask the attendant to move away from the dispenser while filling. If you still feel that he is cheating stop him from filling your tank and call the manager and lodge your complain. If nobody at the station admits their fraud or deny any assistance, reach out to DPR

FREEDAY FREE FOOD FOR FRIENDS’ FREAKING FREETHINKING Vol  381

REMINSCING SOME SWEET SCENES OF MY CHILDHOOD

I miss those days when we went to school, lined up & the headmistress & teachers inspected our nails & uniform & then we match to our classrooms,u remember na??

The days of Nasco Biscuit, Okin biscuit, Trebor, Iced Colored water tied in nylon we called it “lolly” ; the days of Goody-Goody & pako Biscuit ;the days of Ali & Simbi, Mr Salami & Mrs Salami, Agbo lives in Calabar, Edet is a boy .
Chei, I remember those days when one naira na money, when groundnut was 5kobo & choco milo sweet was 5 kobo; days of messing game; who is in d garden; police and thief; the days of mama & papa play

The days wen we use to build houses with sand, play suwe game,tinco tinco, change your style, ten ten, skipping, stop! You remember na!
Those days when we used to fly kite on streets, when boys used to use the paint bucket cover as tyre & their daddy’s hanger as the steering. Those days when rubber band was stock exchange; the days when Voltron, Jimbo, Power Rangers, Spider Man was our favourite cartoons . The days of limca soft drinks& choco milo advert on black & white tv & sunday rendevous by1:30pm; when we say ‘leke leke give me white finger’

Those days when eleganza pen was the best. The days when we used to drink water from the tap even suck out d water if its not coming out ; the days when NTA will show rainbow color for 30 minutes then national anthem before they resume program @ 4pm .

The days when basket sandals, Simbi & Bata sandals were the best . Days when we all sing sandalili sandalili songs.

DSTV, Startimes and other satellite/pay TV have come, no more old fun.

I’m really proud to have experienced all these. If you are not smiling it means you were not born in my generation. Which means you are the golden penny, indomie noodles generation!
Happy Children’s Day.

Meet the Worst Pope in History

F

orget about the Borgias, this pope used the papal armies to massacre his family’s enemies, engage in incestuous threesomes, and question Mary’s virginity.

Remember when Pope Benedict XVI abdicated and the media went into a meltdown? You probably heard around then that this wasn’t the first abdication, and that Celestine V had abdicated about 800 years earlier. And then we promptly forgot about all of that when Pope Francis was elected. Because, Francis.

Things could have gone very differently.

When Celestine V abdicated in 1294 he was succeeded by Pope Boniface VIII. Celestine was an 85-year old hermit from Naples. He was originally selected because of his great piety but he was, as Eamon Duffy has written, “saintly but hopeless.” Some thought that electing an “angelic Pope” like Celestine would help free the papacy of corruption. But it was not to be: Celestine was badgered into resigning by his successor. A more savvy diplomat, Boniface’s first move as Pope was to secure his position by having Celestine imprisoned in the Castle of Fumone. Celestine endured 10 miserable months of mistreatment there before finally kicking the bucket.

Thus began the reign of Boniface VIII, one of history’s least saintly Popes. Born a minor noble in Anagni, Italy, Benedetto Caetani (as he was then known) had a strong dictatorial streak. He was a talented canon lawyer and member of the Curia before being ordained a cardinal in 1291.

Boniface was a fierce believer in Papal supremacy (just not that of his predecessor). He involved himself in continental affairs, getting into diplomatic spats with foreign monarchs like Philip IV of France, when he dared to tax the French clergy. Boniface issued a swift succession of Papal bulls including the notorious Unam Sanctam, in which he effectively claimed all civil and spiritual authority for himself: “We declare, state and define that it is absolutely necessary to salvation for every human creature to be subject to the Roman Pontiff.” This particular teaching was not repudiated until Vatican II.

Francis he was not. And it wasn’t just his lack of humility that earned him his reputation. Boniface famously clashed with other Italian figureheads and engaged in a relentless war against his family’s traditional rivals. In particular, he feuded with the powerful Colonna family. In one instance, Boniface used the Papal armies to raze several Colonna towns to the ground. Among them was Palestrina, a town of 6,000 people, every one of whom was massacred at Boniface’s command. This was reportedly after the town had surrendered having received assurances from Boniface that they would be spared.

In his personal life, though, Boniface was chaste and contrite. Just kidding. Not content with committing one mortal sin at a time, he was known for engaging in threesomes with a married woman and her daughter. If you’re keeping track, that’s three divine laws broken in a single night (adultery, incest, and breaking the vows of celibacy). Which is reprehensible or efficient, depending on your perspective.

D88GCD Bonifacius Viii Prisoner

Chronicle/Alamy

Pope Bonifacius VIII was arrested on the orders of Philippe IV of France, for somewhat specious reasons. He was released and died a few weeks later.

In the end, though, Boniface got his comeuppance: He died a month after a kidnapping and brutal beating at the hands of his enemies. Some stories of his demise reported that he died in a frenzy, feverishly gnawing off his own hands and beating his brains out. This is the stuff of myth. An accidental exhumation of his tomb in the 17th century, however, revealed that he was both tall and in possession of shapely hands.

It was only after his death that the worst rumors about Boniface began to surface. His old adversary Philip IV of France demanded that he be exhumed and burned as a heretic. Boniface’s successor, Clement V, balked at the idea but nevertheless a council met in 1312 at Vienne. Boniface was acquitted, but the witnesses who met there claimed that Boniface was not just immoral, but also a non-believer. According to some reports he had said that the Eucharist was “just flour and water” and, most shockingly, that Mary was no more a virgin than his own mother and that there was “no more harm in adultery that in rubbing your hands together.” Most of these accusations are likely to have been amassed by Boniface’s French accusers so it’s difficult to know how much credibility to give them. Nevertheless, early editions of the Cambridge Medieval History summarized the situation by saying that he was doctrinally a skeptic and that the moral code held little meaning for him.

In the end, Boniface’s quest for absolute power has earned him the disapproval of his fellow Catholics. In the Inferno, Dante Aligheri places Boniface in the eighth circle of hell, in the pit of the simonists (those who bought and sold church offices). Boniface was not even dead at the time of the Inferno’s composition but in Dante’s imagination the damned welcomed the power-hungry corrupt cleric ahead of his time.

 

Credits : Yahoonews, The Daily Beast