List of Nigerian Drug Smugglers Sentenced To Death By The Buhari Military Regime

Today, it is not uncommon for you to pick up a piece of magazine and newspaper and see that a Nigerian or Nigerians have been sentenced to death in a foreign land. Their crimes? Drug smuggling. Although it is quite shocking to many, there was a time in Nigeria when drug traffickers were sentenced to death by firing squad based on Decree 20 put in place by the military junta of the Muhammadu Buhari regime. Today, I will take a look at what happened back in time, the intrigues surrounding the executions and the responses that came with the killings. The following Nigerians were executed on Nigerian soil by the Nigerian government for trafficking drugs and how it all happened:

  1. BARTHOLOMEW OWOH, 26. His last words were: ‘If I knew this would happen to me, I would not have been involved in drugs.’ He was arrested on the 26th of May, 1984 at the Murtala Muhammed International Airport, Lagos for being in possession of cocaine.
  2. BERNARD OGEDEGBE (OGEDENGBE), 29
  3. ALHAJI AKANNI LAWAL OJUOLAPE, 29: He was arrested on the 18th of June, 1984 also at MMIA for unlawful possession of cocaine.

The trio of Owoh, Ogedegbe and Ojuolape were executed on 10th April, 1985 at the Kirikiri Maximum Security Prisons in Lagos and Nigerians protested seriously over the matter describing it as too harsh, tyrannical and inhuman. They were shot by six marksmen at exactly 0932 AM and certified dead by the police doctor three minutes later. They were the first to be executed for offences under Decree 20 of 1984.

The next three people on the list (Tairu, Oguntayo and Omosebi) were sentenced to death the same day in the same court by the same judge in April 1985. Their cases were handled by the Special Tribunal (Miscellaneous Offences) chaired by Justice Adebayo Desalu. The judge sentenced the three (two ladies, one man) to death by the firing squad.

  1. SIDIKATU TAIRU (aka ALHAJA SIDIKATU TAIRU): She was arrested alongside Shola Oguntayo on the 21st of August 1984 at the Murtala Muhammed International Airport, Lagos, for concealing heroin in their private parts. That was how they landed in front of the tribunal for possession of the drug without lawful authority.

List of Nigerian Drug Smugglers Sentenced To Death By The Buhari Military Regime 3_Naijarchives

5- MISS SHOLA OGUNTAYO (aka Mrs. AYISAT AJIKE MOHAMMED): She had given birth to a baby boy while she was in detention and awaiting trial. As she was taken inside the dock, a stream of tears ran down her face. Once inside the dock and listening to the stone-faced judge, all Oguntayo could do was cry. It was as if she could smell death in the air.

MISS SHOLA OGUNTAYO (aka Mrs. AYISAT AJIKE MOHAMMED).

6- OLADELE OMOSEBI: He was charged with aiding in the possession of heroin, also without lawful authority. Bald-headed Omosebi was wearing a cream French suit and as the judge was reading the verdict, he just stared at the space below him, looking away from the tribunal judges.

 OLADELE OMOSEBI

As the trio (Tairu, Oguntayo and Omosebi) were marched into the dock on Tuesday, 23rd April, 1985 to listen to the final judgment, they were followed everywhere by journalists and photographs who blasted their faces with unwanted lights from television cameras, flash bulb cameras and all sorts of gadgets. As the first set of the Decree 20 convicts were executed just six days earlier, the courtroom was besieged by Nigerians anxious to know what the verdict was going to be.

As Judge Desalu read the judgment, his voice was in a dreaded monotone and his face did not betray a single emotion. The ominous signs were everywhere: the wall backed by the tribunal members was black and Desalu himself was seated on a black leather chair. His navy blue suit pointed to the sober nature of the event. The accused were so emotionally subdued that they could not even look in the judge’s direction. Tairu was so tensed and stressed that all she was doing was to gnaw continuously at the wooden panel of the dock with her right thumb and index finger. Judge Desalu was not moved. From the tone of his voice, it was clear the three accused were doomed and the most emotional of the three of them, Oguntayo was almost convulsing and tried but failed to hold the hot tears back. Desalu continued reading:

‘We are convinced that the statements of the accused were voluntarily made. The second accused person had full knowledge and was aware of the contents of the package put in her private part. Decree 20, as amended, places the proof of lawful possession on the accused persons and there was no evidence that the first and second defendants had lawful possession. The prosecution has established its case beyond reasonable doubt and accordingly, we find the first and second accused guilty…’

As Desalu mentioned the word ‘guilty’, a frightening, alien-like scream pierced the entire courtroom. Everyone was shocked and confused, some were terrified. The scream was from Oguntayo, who was so mortified with the fear of an impending death that she collapsed on the floor and five mobile policemen rushed to hold her, while 10 others formed a ring around her in the dock and one cupped her mouth and gripped her neck with his palms. She must have been thinking of not just her death via the bullets but what was going to become of her baby.

As for the third accused, Desalu continued in relation to the second count:

All the evidence against the third accused, remained uncontradicted. We believe that, apart from the confessional statement of the third accused, the statements of the first and second about the third accused are worthy of credit. We are satisfied that the third conspired with the first and second accused to commit an offence under Decree 20 as amended by Decree 34.

To cut the story short, Omosebi was also sentenced to death. The defence counsel of the convicted pleaded that the sentence be mitigated but Desalu said the law under which the tribunal was operating was absolute and fixed. He said:

The only penalty prescribed by Decree 20 on the conviction of death is by firing squad. In compliance with this provision, the sentence on the three accused persons is death by firing squad. May the Lord have mercy on your soul.

After the final verdict was given, Omosebi turned and took a look at the crowd and as he did so, his forearms flashed and on them were tattoos on each. The tattoos had the same floral design with green and red patterns and on both arms were written:

Lara, kiss me.

But that day, Lara was nowhere to kiss him. It was death that gave him a cold cuddle.

7- GLADYS CAROLINE IYAMAH: She was a postgraduate student of the University of Bombay, India. She was 29 as at the time of her execution and was the mother of a toddler and two paraplegic and badly-deformed girls. Mrs. Iyamah was convicted for cocaine trafficking and there were concerns then over whether she should be executed in public or not. She became the very woman in Nigeria to be sentenced to death by firing squad for cocaine trafficking and she pleaded that her sentence be reduced as she was forced into cocaine smuggling as she had to provide for her kids. The Lagos Zone of the Miscellaneous Offences Tribunal pronounced that Gladys should be shot, subject to ratification by the Supreme Military Council (SMC) which is the confirming authority. The photos of her kids were circulated widely in the press and by groups calling for her to be spared the death sentence.

8- LASUNKANMI TAJUDEEN AWOLOLA

9- JIMI ADEBAYO: He was an accountant.

10- MISS MORONKE FAUSA LAWAL (also saved from execution by the Babangida regime).

On the 15th of May, 1985, the Supreme Military Council (SMC) confirmed the death sentences by firing squad passed on Iyamah and co. But she and Shola Oguntayo were spared from public execution when General Ibrahim Babangida took over in a military coup on the 27th of August, 1985. IBB abolished the death penalty for drug trafficking and the smugglers were soon in business – till date.

THE RESPONSE OF NIGERIANS THEN

Hmmm…well, you know that today on social media whenever I post that a Nigerian has been killed in Indonesia for drugs, the comments you will be seeing will be like, well, what was he looking for carrying drugs, oh, na dem again, it is good for him like that and stuff but Nigerians of the 1980s were much more vocal and defended their positions much more intelligently even if they were under the iron-grip of a military dictator. They protested against the executions. In fact, as Desalu was given his judgments, there were protests against the trio of Owo, Ogedegbe and Ojulope executed days earlier. One of the loudest voices of those against the executions was that of Wole Soyinka, then a professor of comparative literature at the Ife University (now Obafemi Awolowo University). He called the executions of Tairu and co a ‘triple cold-blooded murder’ which every Nigerian was forced to be an accomplice. He was not alone in the condemnation.

Olubunmi Okogie, an army chaplain during the Nigerian Civil War and then Catholic Bishop of Lagos was also against the killings. He said:

Life is a sacred thing which should not be toyed with.’ He argued further saying: ‘God’s laws forbids killing except in ‘just wars’. Without being specific, decrees dealing with human lives when carefully looked at should not per se attract capital punishment.

Olu Onagoruwa also added his voice saying that a cocaine pusher cannot be deterred by the certainty that he would be shot. He said:

It is therefore unnecessary to impose the death penalty where there is no evidence that it deters.

The Nigerian Bar Association (NBA) condemned it calling a ‘dangerous precedent’. Bola Ajibola, the NBA President said:

…it is against the rule of law for people to be charged, tried, convicted and sentenced on any law that was not in existence at the time the offence was committed.

But, there were others who supported the executions, and they also did it as loudly as they could. One of them was the late Gani Fawehinmi, who became the first Nigerian to publicly support the execution then when he said:

How can anyone in his right senses pity these messengers of death? The criticisms are thoroughly unjustified, misguided and emotively sentimental.

NB: The sentencing to death of these people marked the first time in the history of Nigeria that such would happen. Prior to that time, no one was condemned to death for drug trafficking, let alone executed. Thus, to many Nigerians of that time, it was truly a shocker. Many expected the sentences to be commuted to life imprisonment but were disappointed when the convicts were swiftly executed. It was a brutal time of War Against Indiscipline spearheaded by the late Major-General Tunde Idiagbon ( in a repressive junta headed by Major-General Muhammadu Buhari (now the president and a reformed democrat). Later under the presidency of Olusegun Obasanjo, the family of Bartholomew Owoh sent a barrage of petitions over the retroactive legislations (Owoh, Ojulope and Ogedegbe were awaiting trial when the decree was promulgated so the law used to execute them was not in existence as at the time they committed the said offence) to the Human Rights Violation Investigation Commission (HRVIC, aka Oputa Panel) against General Buhari who was summoned repeatedly to appear before the panel which he never did.

 

 

 

FULL CREDITS : Naijarchives

Full Transcript Of President Buhari’s Latest CNN Interview

On Tuesday, President Muhammadu Buhari was interviewed by CNN’s Christiane Amanpour. Read full transcript of the interview below:

AMANPOUR: President Buhari, welcome back to the program.
BUHARI: Thank you.

AMANPOUR: Mr. President, you have asked the United States to help you in the fight against Boko Haram. What exactly did you ask in this regard? What do you need? And what answer did the president, Obama, give you?
BUHARI: United States, leader of the G7, promised to do what they can to help Nigeria. So we have brought our requirements in terms of training, equipping and intelligence gathering for Nigeria to be able to fight Boko Haram.

AMANPOUR: And you mentioned the economy and the falling in oil prices over the last many months. How are you going to deal with that? Because that is really what your people want.
BUHARI: My people firstly, I believe, they want the security (ph) in the country to be stabilized so that normal life, both in the southern part of the country, where the militants are still sabotaging oil installations and kidnapping people and demanding ransom, and in the northeast of the country, where Boko Haram is still active. This is the military occupation of Nigeria now and is the reality of (INAUDIBLE). Nothing will work until the country is secure.

AMANPOUR: But despite your vows to tackle Boko Haram, there are reports in your own country that there have been at least 400 deaths by that group since you became president. Added to that, Amnesty International reports that your military has totally lost the credibility and trust of the people because of the systematic human rights abuses, the killing of some 8,000 people. How do you expect your military to be able to go against Boko Haram, to get the trust of the people instead of being a platform for Boko Haram’s grievances?
BUHARI: Well, I have just mentioned that, under Lake Chad Basin Commission, we have agreed to form a multinational joint task force. So whatever happened before that decision was taken, we have to allow further investigation to verify the question of human rights abuse. And with that, I’m sure you must have known the decision taken by this government, the federal government of Nigeria, in changing the military command.

AMANPOUR: What about the girls, the famous Chibok girls, the 200 or so who were abducted so long ago? Yet again there’s been a suggestion that the Boko Haram captors may trade them, may seek to trade them for incarcerated inmates, who they want to get out. Is your government willing to trade those girls in that regard?
BUHARI: We have to be very careful about the credibility of various Boko Haram leaderships coming up and declaring that they can deliver. We have to be very careful indeed. And we are taking our time because we want to bring them safe back to their parents and to their school.

AMANPOUR: So are you in principle against or would you consider negotiating with Boko Haram if you can verify the credibility of those who approach you?
BUHARI: I cannot be (INAUDIBLE). I told you our main objective as a government is to secure those girls safe and sound back to their schools and rehabilitated them to go back to normal life. So if we are convinced that the leadership has presented itself can deliver those girls, (INAUDIBLE) who will be (INAUDIBLE) negotiate what they want.

AMANPOUR: Let me ask you because, look, you came to power on a platform that you would do better than the previous president, in all regards: security, corruption, economy, et cetera. But there have been hundreds of people killed since you’ve become president. How can you do any better?
BUHARI: I think I have — I can be held to my promises for the next three and three-quarter years ahead of me. And I think (INAUDIBLE) also is too early for anybody to pass judgment on my campaign promises.

AMANPOUR: What about your campaign promise to root out corruption? If they turned out that some of the guilty ones were members of your own party or your own associates, would you crack down on them, too?
BUHARI: I just have to. There isn’t going to be any party member or any personality that can escape justice.

AMANPOUR: Mr. President, are you disappointed that President Obama is yet again not going to Nigeria, the biggest and most economically powerful country in Africa?
BUHARI: Well, I wouldn’t say I was disappointed. But how I wished he will change his mind and go to Nigeria.

AMANPOUR: Did you ask him? Did he say he would?
BUHARI: Well, I will ask him. I will send a formal invitation.

AMANPOUR: So finally, let me ask you about a previous African leader, a former African leader, the former dictator of Chad, Hissene Habre, who is being tried — or at least they’re trying to try him — in Senegal. And he’s refusing to cooperate. Do you support that process of trying an accused African leader in Africa rather than at the International Criminal Court?
BUHARI: Justice is justice, whether it’s done in Africa or elsewhere in the world. The important thing is let justice be done, whatever evidence the prosecution has in Senegal. I think they should — you should proceed to make it available to the world and prosecute him according to international law on human rights.

AMANPOUR: So you — so you support that process?
BUHARI: I support any process that is based on justice.

AMANPOUR: President Muhammadu Buhari of Nigeria, thank you for joining me from Washington today.
BUHARI: Thank you very much.

Full credits: CNN
Naijarchives

I believe I will succeed, says Buhari

President Muhammadu Buhari on Wednesday said that he believes he would succeed despite the daunting task ahead of him, noting that, he would work very hard to sustain the current goodwill his government had received at home and abroad.

The President, who was reacting to a question after his address at the United States Institute for Peace, in Washington DC on how he intended to leverage on the enormous goodwill being enjoyed by his administration and meet the huge expectations of the people, said despite his perceived slowness and the reality of lack of resources, he would work very hard “so that people will see and believe that we are trying and can deliver and hopefully become less critical.”

President Buhari, while acknowledging the huge challenges confronting his administration such as the crash in the price of crude oil, its theft, pipeline vandalisation in the Niger Delta, hostage taking and insecurity in the North East, restated his determination to sustain the goodwill by working very hard.
“And I believe I will succeed,” he declared emphatically.

In his main speech to the distinguished audience, the President also reaffirmed that, “despite our current challenges, Nigeria’s commitment to good governance, anti-corruption, democracy and security of lives and property remains firm. Similarly, I must reaffirm that despite the current challenges that we face domestically, we are ready and willing to face our duties…​Fixing Nigeria’s problems as formidable as they are is the responsibility of Nigerians.

The international community can only assist, but the hard work belongs to Nigerians and their government. I will as President, lead from the front, but all Nigerians, including the opposition parties, civil society, business and religious leaders, public servants, labour unions, the youth and professional associations all have important roles to play to get our country back on a sound economic footing.”

On the required external support in the anti-insurgency and terrorism campaign, he expressed regret that, “the blanket application of the Leahy Law by the United States on the grounds of unproven allegations of human rights violations levelled against our forces has denied us access to appropriate strategic weapons to prosecute the war against the insurgents.” He noted that in “the face of abduction of innocent school girls from their hostels, indiscriminate bombings of civilians in markets and places of worship, our forces have remained largely impotent because they do not possess the appropriate weapons and technology which they could have had, had the so called human rights violations not been an obstacle.”

According to President Buhari, “​Unwittingly, and I dare say, unintentionally, the application of the Leahy law amendment by the U. S. Government has aided and abated the Boko Haram terrorist group in the prosecution of its extremist ideology and hate, the indiscriminate killings and maiming of civilians, in raping of women and girls, and in their other heinous crimes. I believe this is not the spirit of the Leahy Laws. I know the American people cannot support any group engaged in these crimes. ​I therefore strongly appeal to both the Executive Arm and the US Congress to examine how the US Government can provide us with far more substantial counter-terrorism assistance with minimal strings. The longer we delay, the deadlier the Boko Haram gets. At all events, we have re-written the rules of engagement protecting the rights of combatants and in particular safeguarding civilians in theatres of conflict.”

Before the President’s address at the last programme of his four-day visit, the former United States Secretary of State for African Affairs, Ambassador Johnnie Carson, who moderated the interactive session, had described President Buhari as a “very humble and strong personality with enormous integrity and commitment to good governance and uplifting the lives of the citizenry.”

Senate/Nat-Ass Crises: Saraki/Dogara vs APC vs Lawan/Gbajabiamila vs (Tinubu) vs others : Food for Thot (my opinion)

The men who do not wish the party well only wish for the party their ambition. They do not love Buhari. They only sat in the train or rode in the same carriage because he was the only one in whose company they could clutch their selfish dreams.

Their schemes are coming home to roast, not roost.
Their plan was simple. Let us win in the Senate and House of Reps, make it a fate accompli. Later, we can con the president onboard. They took the president for a simpleton because of his simplicity, innocence and openness (and perhaps naïveity) . Atiku formed the dubious coalition with Saraki and Obj because of the ambitions of 2019. The man who won 2015 has not settled down to office, their 2019 ambitions want to unsettle his administration. But in all these, they want to throw cats in the pigeons of the president. After causing confusion, they want to present themselves as angels of peace.

That is the so-called reconciliation move. It is capital self-delusion and hypocrisy. They want reconciliation without truth. They say the Lawan and Gbajabiamila groups should accept the fait accompli of Dogara and Saraki leaderships in the National Assembly. Now, how do they want to explain two irrationalities. One, the party arrived at two candidates for Senate President and Speaker. Saraki and Dogari, in one accord, defied it, plotted with the enemy, waylaid the party and disgraced the majority vote.

How do you live with the fact that a party decides something, some members flout it, and no penalties are imposed? Does that not turn the party into an impunity machine? Was that not one of the capital reasons the PDP was flushed out on March 28? Is the APC not going back to its vomit by starting off embracing the enemy’s mistake?

If they wanted reconciliation, why did Saraki and Dogarra spurn the party’s letters? The argument that the law is more important than the party is a self-serving line. The law towers above all, but law is itself based on honour. When we manipulate the law and defrock it of honour, we work against the very spirit of law. That was what the Saraki group did. The Dogari group also did exactly the same. It is haunting them, and it will haunt them forever.

Now we hear that the Deputy Senate President – Ike Ekweremadu forged the senate guildelines in order for him to emerge deputy senate president despite being from a minority party – PDP. The police is investigating. But if true, it is sure he couldn’t have carried it out alone. He must have involved others including the Clerk of The Senate. You know I wrote about this that I strongly suspected this immediately it occured. I wrote this as an article then: https://m.facebook.com/notes/michael-drbiggie-adeyemi-i/senatenational-assembly-elections-the-politics-the-coup-and-buharis-big-bad-blun/920650674658376/?refid=21

Now things are coming out clearer and my initial points are being vindicated by events.

In the end, if this case is established and goes to court, the Supreme Court will be left to interpret the law. There can be no doubt that the court will find that there is only one law that has given anyone powers to make rules for The Senate, and that law is The Constitution where senators “SHALL” make rules for themselves (not “may”, it says “shall”). No flawed tradition of clerks creating rules for senators, as claimed by Ekweremadu, can override provisions of The Constitution.

Those illegal rules were definitely applied to the election of Deputy Senate President. Arguably, The Clerk used the false compilation of rules to conduct all the proceedings of the inauguration day. He cannot say he did otherwise (He did not use the 2011 rules or any others made by senators.)

Based on this, both Saraki and Ekweremadu were elected using a process derived from rules not recognized by law, and will cease to hold their positions which are a product of it. ”

Reconciliation without truth is going to the future without memory. It is like pursuing an end without a beginning. If we reach where we are going without knowledge of where we are coming from, we will not know why we started the journey.

Part of Nigeria’s problem is that we have not resolved many issues and we move on. But we never move on, and unresolved issues haunt us always, so woes pile on woes in our national life.

List of The Chiefs of Army Staff of the Nigerian Army

Did you know that apart from the Nigerian President, only the Chief of Army Staff (COAS) can give direct instructions to any soldier in the country? Do you know the meaning of the Arabic inscription on the Nigerian Army crest? (check photo). Do you also know that the Nigerian Army has had 29 chiefs? How many of them do you know?

List of The Chiefs of Army Staff of the Nigerian Army

Nigeria gained independence from the United Kingdom on the 1st of October, 1960. The following are those who have headed the Nigerian Army, a branch of the Nigerian Armed Forces.  Apart from the Nigerian President, the Chief of Army Staff (COAS) is the only other person who can give a direct order to any soldier in the federation. Before January 1966, the head of the army was referred to as the General Officer Commanding (GOC).
  1. Major-General Kenneth G. Exham
  2. Major-General Norman Foster (1960 – 1962)
  3. Major-General John Alexander Mackenzie (1963)
  4. Major-General Sir Christopher Welby-Everard (1963 – 1965)
  5. Major-General Johnson Thomas Aguiyi-Ironsi (February 1965 – January 1966)
  6. Lieutenant-Colonel Yakubu Cinwa Gowon (January 1966 – July 1966)
  7. Lieutenant-Colonel Joseph Akahan (August 1966 – July 1967)
  8. Major-General Hassan Usman Katsina (January 1968 – January 1971)
  9. Major-General David Ejoor (January 1971 – July 1975)
  10. Lieutenant-General Theophilus Yakubu ‘TY’ Danjuma (July 1975 – September 1979)
  11. Lieutenant-General Alani Akinrinade (October 1979 – April 1980)
  12. Lieutenant-General Jibson Jalo (April 1980 – October 1981)
  13. Lieutenant-General Mohammed Inuwa Wushishi (October 1981 – December 1983)
  14. Major-General Ibrahim Babangida (January 1984 – August 1985)
  15. Lieutenant-General Sani Abacha (August 1985 – September 1990)
  16. Lieutenant-General Salihu Ibrahim (September 1990 – August 1993)
  17. Lieutenant-General Aliyu Mohammed Gusau (September 1993 – November 1993)
  18. Major-General Chris Alli (November 1993 – August 1994)
  19. Major-General Alwali Jaji Kazir (August 1994 – March 1996)
  20. Major-General Ishaya Rizi Bamaiyi (March 1996 – May 1999)
  21. Lieutenant-General Samuel Victor Leo Malu (May 1999 – April 2001)
  22. Lieutenant-General Alexander Oderuduo Ogomudia (April 2001 – June 2003)
  23. Lieutenant-General Martin Luther Agwai (June 2003 – May 2006)
  24. Lieutenant-General Owoye Andrew Azazi (June 2006 – May 2007)
  25. Lieutenant-General Luka Nyeh Yusuf (June 2007 – August 2008)
  26. Lieutenant-General Abdulrahman Bello Dambazau (August 2008 – September 2010)
  27. Lieutenant-General Onyeabor Azubuike Ihejirika (September 2010 – February 2014)
  28. Major-General Kenneth Tobiah Jacob Minimah (February 2014 – August 2015)
  29. Major-General Tukur Yusuf Buratai (August 2015 – )

 

 

FULL CREDITS : Naijarchives

Inside story of why Dasuki is in trouble

Contrary to in­sinuations that President Mu­hammadu Bu­hari ordered the arrest of former National Security Adviser, Col Sambo Da­suki because he was the Army officer who led sol­diers to arrest him (Bu­hari) on the day he was overthrown as military Head of State in August 1985, facts emerging from the security circle indi­cate that the retired Army Colonel is wanted in con­nection with multi-billion dollar funds domiciled in his office as NSA.

Between Thursday eve­ning and 6pm yesterday (Friday), Department of State Security Service (DSS) operatives had been searching for Dasuki in his Abuja and Sokoto homes. Though, he was believed to be in his Abuja home. He eventually allowed the DSS detectives to enter his house to execute a search warrant. At the end of the search, it was learnt that items recovered from the house included $40,000, three automatic rifles and his travel documents. The operatives thereafter va­cated the house.

It was however gathered that all funds budgeted for the war against Boko Ha­ram terror and other securi­ty issues were all domiciled in the office of Dasuki as NSA. There are allegations that some of the huge funds were diverted for some ex­traneous purposes rather than the prosecution of the war against terror.

It was also learnt that defence contracts, includ­ing purchase of arms and ammunition that used to be under the Ministry of Defence, were taken over by Dasuki. He dominated the environment, so much so that the Ministry of De­fence was no longer in the know about these transac­tions as they were fully taken over by the office of the NSA.

With huge funds under his control, Service Chiefs and other security chiefs also began reporting to Da­suki, it is alleged.

Saturday Sun further gathered that the disburse­ment of over $3 billion USD already expended in the fight against Boko Ha­ram, was presided over by Dasuki. At a point in time, the funds were also alleg­edly used to finance the ruling Peoples Democratic Party (PDP) then especial­ly during the electioneering campaign. Inside sources also say that the immediate past Service Chiefs ought to be quizzed because they also were parties to the disbursement of the terror funds.

It was further gathered that under Dasuki, Min­istry of Defence became toothless and a mere feath­erweight, a development that had never happened before in the nation’s his­tory.

At a point, former Minis­ter of Defence, Gen. Aliyu Gusau became disgruntled and wanted to go because Dasuki took over some of his duties. The former Min­ister felt he was just warm­ing seat. Another reliable security source added that the invasion of Dasuki’s residence by DSS opera­tives has nothing to do with whether he led a team of soldiers to arrest Buhari on Sallah Day some years ago.

“Some people have been trying to portray Buhari as being unforgiving, venge­ful, and that he never for­gets. This is not true and has no connection with the effort to arrest the former ex-NSA. DDS invasion of Dasuki’s house has nothing to do with Buhari. Simply put, his travails with the DSS has to do with bil­lions of terror funds he dis­bursed as NSA”, the source stressed.

Additional Credits : THE SUN
Naijarchives

Experience of a first-time hemp smoker

I had just moved out of my parents house and was sharing a room with my “friend”. I had no idea he smoked weed,
despite his suspicious movements and signature weed scent (abi na odour?) barely two weeks after moving in with him, my worst fears were confirmed as he started bringing home his weed smoking buddies and they would occassionally roll a wrap and smoke it right there in the
room or mix the weed with beans or spagehtti. Being a very curious person i always wondered what made
them happy after smoking, so i decided to find out for
myself(wrong move)

It was a very hot day in february, a saturday i think it was, my friend was out as usual. I searched everywhere for his stash but couldn’t find it so i decided to go and get mine. I arrived the weed joint all sweaty and nervous, half
expecting to get muged but nobody seemed to be aware of
my presence there, they were all on different planets all
expect one i concluded that he must be the seller so i
approached him and the following conversation ensued:

Me: how far?

Weed seller: i dey

Me: i wan buy weed

Weed seller: how many parcel?

Me: parcel ke? Iro oo, na just small i need

Weed seller: laughs really hard. bolo leleyi sha(meaning
this guy is a dunce oo)

Apparently, a parcel of weed is that small wrap, i didn’t
know that. I thought it was something very large.

I gave him 1000naira and he gave me a tiny wrap of weed
with a white paper, i was suprised when he gave me 950 as change. I couldn’t believe weed was that cheap.

On my way home, i decided not to smoke it but mix it with
beans because i thought that it will be better that way
(another wrong move). Long story short, i cooked beans
and added the whole weed, ate it and called my friend, i told
him ogbeni i just ate weed oo and nothing happened to me
this one that you people will eat and be feeling funky, i don
chop am oo. My friend was like ehen you be strong man oo
I decided to take a quick nap before doing laundry.

I woke up about 20 minutes later on the floor i was banging my head on the floor, and i couldn’t stop, my heart beat was so audible and fast, everything was extra bright and extra loud.

After a few minutes of head banging, i was able to get up
from the floor, I felt as if i had just gained access to a part of my mind that I never knew existed previously, it was scary and cool at the same time. I could feel the blood flowing in my veins(you have to experience it to believe it. Though I strongly advise
against it) i felt so uncomfortable in the room, it felt like I was in an oven suddenly a voice in my head wisphered ” ogbeni bo aso e joor” (off your clothes) i obeyed. The voice came again oya sa re(now run) that was when i realised that the weed had taken effect so i decided to take a shower to see if it will calm me down, but the water felt so hot on my skin so hot i ran out of the bathroom.

I called my friend to see if he could help me make sense of
what was going on but he laughed at me, he asked me the quantity of weed i took and i told him i used a whole parcel, he said guyyyyy you don eff up if you no sleep in the next 30mins, you go mad oo go chemist make you go explain yourself.

By this time things had escalated, i had a severe itch at the back of my head that wouldn’t go away no matter how hard i scratched and i was convinced that the beating in my chest was an evil spirit that could only be killed with a
punch. I ran to my neighbour champion and told him
champion e jo e fun mi lese laya (champion pls punch me in the chest) ti e ba gbami lese laya mo ma ku oo(if you don’t
punch me i will die oo). He hissed and walked out having
had enough of such nonsense from the boys in the boys
quatters.

The voice in my head came again iwo na o de gba ara e
lese laya abi o ti fe ku ni (why don’t you punch yourself in the
chest or do you want to die?) i punched and punched but
there was no difference.
The house was getting hotter, the voice in my head was
getting louder, the itch in my head was getting worse, and
the evil spirit in my chest was getting louder. Then came
the voice again oya ma sare lo(start running) so i started
running but on getting outside in the sun, i felt so cold i was
shivering but that didn’t stop me from running(i would have
given husain bolt a run for his money on that day).

On getting to the chemist, i realised i was bare footed, i told him i had a severe headache i needed something to make me sleep immediately, he gave me the drug and i chewed it right there in his presence, next i asked him to give me a drug for evil spirit, that was when he realised something was wrong with me and chased me out.

I got back home and tried to sleep but my heart beat
wouldnt let me, so i ran back out this time around to a nurse
in the area, first thing she asked was kilode o wo bata ni?
(why don’t you have your shoes on? I told her jackie chan ti gba bata lowo mi (jackie chan collected my shoes) i was
finally able to explain my situation to her and she took me in, tied something around my elbow and injected me directly in the vein. I passed out immediately only to wake around 1 or 2am in the middle of the night with the worst kind of hunger I have ever felt in my life. I ate a whole loaf of butter
field bread in one sitting without butter or tea.

I came home to a hero’s welcome, my friend told me e be like say your head no carry am but e go better make you try am once more so you go dey use to it. The following day
while the house was empty, I packed my Ghana must go
and like the prodigal son in the bible I went back home to
my parents.

It’s been a few years since that experience but the lesson I learnt is an unforgettable one. My curiosity hasn’t gotten me in trouble again and my circle of friends have since changed.

Author unknown.

10 Facts About the US Prison System

U.S. President Barack Obama became the first sitting president to visit a federal prison as part of his push for fairer justice system and prison reform. Obama traveled Thursday to El Reno prison in the midwestern state of Oklahoma.

In a speech earlier this week, Obama called for either reducing or eliminating mandatory minimum sentences for non-violent drug crimes, reconsidering solitary confinement for prisoners and increasing job training programs for people while they are incarcerated.He also announced a federal review of the use of solitary confinement and urged Congress to pass a sentencing reform bill by year’s end.

The United States is the world’s largest jailer accounting for nearly 25 percent of the world’s prison population despite making up just less than five percent of the world’s population.

10 Facts About the US Prison System

1. The United States’ current prison population totals 2.3 million people. Roughly one in 100 adults lives behind bars. (ACLU.org)

2. African-Americans are incarcerated at nearly six times the rate of whites and constitute nearly 1 million of the prison population of 2.3 million. (NAACP.org)

3. The lifetime likelihood of imprisonment is 1 in 3 for Black men; 1 in 6 for Latino men; and 1 in 17 for White men. (SentencingProject.org)

4. African Americans represent 12% of the total population of drug users, but make up 38% of those arrested for drug offenses. More than half of those arrested (59%) receive prison sentences as opposed to probation or drug rehabilitation. (NAACP.org)

5. One in 9 prisoners is serving a life sentence. In 2012, close to 160,000 people were serving life sentences, with nearly 50,000 serving life sentences without parole. (SentencingProject.org)

6. The annual cost to house an inmate in a Federal prison is just over $29,000. For state prisons, the price per inmate averages around $31,000. (Federal Bureau of Prisons, Vera.org)

7. In 48 states, a felony conviction can result in the loss of voting rights, thereby affecting the political voice of many communities. Nearly 6 million Americans are unable to vote due to felony disenfranchisement policies. (SentencingProject.org)

8. The number of youths in prison has declined steadily from a peak of nearly 78,000 in 1999 to just over 35,000 in 2013. (SentencingProject.org)

9. Black, Latino, and American Indian youths enter the prison system more frequently and are more likely to be sentenced to harsher punishments. (SentencingProject.org)

10. The southern states of Louisiana and Mississippi have the highest incarceration rates. Maine and Minnesota have the country’s lowest. (SentencingProject.org)

Additional credits : VOA News
SentencingProject.org
Federal Bureau of Prisons, Vera.org
NAACP.org
ACLU.org

Hospital As Patients Beat Doctors Silly, Psychiatrists On Strike

Doctors at the Federal Neuro-Psychiatric Hospital, Yaba, have cried out over recurrent attacks from mentally challenged patients at the hospital.

The psychiatrists, who are on strike to protest issues of insecurity at the federal hospital, told our correspondent that many of their colleagues had suffered severe injuries due to violent attacks from their patients.

The President, Association of Resident Doctors of the hospital, Dr. Jeje Oyetayo, said that doctors had to embark on an indefinite strike after the last attack on two female doctors at the outpatient unit of the hospital in June.

She said, “Patients have attacked doctors severally at the hospital and we don’t have trained security personnel to address this. But the last one was on the 5th of June, two female doctors were attacked such that consultants had to come and save them.

“The patient took an iron rod and started running around with it and there were no security officials. Patients get violent occasionally but the norm is that there should be trained personnel that can disarm them.

“I mean they should hold their hands and subdue them. But if there are no trained security personnel, the patient and the doctor can be injured in the process of trying to douse the violent situation and it may escalate.”

Oyetayo called on the Federal Government and authorities at the hospital to quickly review the security logistics with a view of protecting the lives of health workers while delivering their duties at the hospital.
 
She said, “There are no escape routes for health workers in case of an emergency such as when we have an aggressive patient which could lead to harm to doctors, patients and relatives.
“There is no functioning alarm system to alert security officials for help in case of an emergency and even the consultants have refused to run clinics due to the security challenges.

“The Federal Ministry of Health needs to step in to avoid loss of lives as well as bodily harm to health workers as well as patients and their relatives,”

Another resident doctor at the hospital who spoke on condition of anonymity on Wednesday also complained that they had to consult for their patients in an unconducive environment, a situation, he said could encourage attacks from patients.

He said, “The chairs and tables in the consulting rooms are rickety. Patients have to stand over doctors and we know the danger of a psychiatric patient towering over anyone.

“Many times, we have six doctors consulting for patients in a room structured for just one doctor and the patient. Many terrible things happen under these circumstances.”

Our correspondent who went round the hospital on Wednesday observed that skeletal services were being offered.

The emergency and outpatient units which used to be filled with patients were almost empty as very few personnel were on ground.

The Medical Director of the hospital, Dr. Rahman Lawal, admitted that the hospital was presently experiencing a shortage of security personnel due to lapses in logistics.

Lawal, however, said that the attack on the doctors in June was due the fact that health workers who should have catered to patients at the emergency unit were on strike.

He said, “ We have been outsourcing security needs for some time now and we are having problems with the payment of our outsourced staff including security personnel. Some leave without telling us they are going and it takes time to replace them.”

-PUNCH

FREEDAY FREE FOOD FOR FRIENDS’ FREAKING FREETHINKING Vols 273, 274 , 275, 276, 277 and 279 +Types of Naija Lecturers+Gov.Aregbesola,pls do the needful +Nigeria’s Chief of Army+Facts about US Prisons+First time hemp smoker+Nigerian crude oil theft

FREEDAY FREE FOOD FOR FRIENDS’ FREAKING FREETHINKING    Vol   273

11 TYPES OF LECTURERS YOU MEET IN NIGERIAN UNIVERSITIES

1. The Sadist — Most students are scared of him. He comes to class, threatens everyone, you rarely see him smile, always serious with a straight face. He never gives an ‘A’ and when result comes out, his courses are always mass failure. He is usually the most hated lecturer.

2. The Comedian — He is more or less a stand-up comedian. Always lively, students look forward to his laughter-filled lectures but once taken for granted, he can be shocking. He is usually stingy with marks/grades.

3. The Student Lecturers — Also known as Assistant lecturers. They usually start as errand boys to some top lecturers in the department, they mark exam scripts, invigilate during tests & exams and later graduate to helping the lecturers with some of their lectures. They are usually hyperactive, aggressive and proud which usually results into a clash with the students.

4. The Crazy Lecturer — He rarely smiles, does things in an unusual manner including ways of speaking(with big grammar like Hon. Patrick Obahiagbon), a funny dress sense(can even wear Kito sandals). He is always REAL and serious, doesn’t care what his students feels or think about him, highly unpredictable and lectures for 3/4hrs until the students complains.

5. The Fatherly Lecturer — He is always matured, homely, approachable, and friendly. He takes his time to extensively teach his students in such a way that once you fail his course, you know that you truly deserve to fail. He is students’ favourite.

6. The Lazy Lecturer — He comes to class twice in a semester(One, for course introduction & later, for revision, a week to Exams). He doesn’t lecture nor teach, he only comes to read out loud while the students listen. He doesn’t care if you understand or not, and 15 or 20mins, he is done for the day’s lecture.

7. The ‘Runs’ Lecturer — He comes to class, gives shabby lectures and drop his mobile digits or his errand boy’s digits(The coded students knows what to do). #‎5k for ‘C’, #‎8k for ‘B’ and #‎10k for ‘A’ depending on the importance or Unit of the course.

8. The Departmental Dog — Woman wrapper. He takes advantage of any vulnerable female student, it doesn’t matter how young she is, the sex addict just want to get laid at the slightest opportunity. Hide your babe, sister, daughter from him.

9. The Story Teller — 90% of his lecture is the story about his days in the University and how serious/dedicated they were those days + how he still consult his 1973 lecture notebook. He talks about how bad the Gov’t and the school management is, especially if he is an ardent ASUU member. He usually receive at least 10 phone calls within a lecture.

10 a. The Religion Fanatic (Spirikoko) — This type of lecturer comes to class to chip in the Gospel within his lecture, inviting the entire class to his church & mid week programmes. He is always gentle but carry expo make him catch u. U go hear ween.

10 b.The Religion Fanatic (Mallam) — He comes to class and usually separates the female students from the male students before his lecture begins. He looks gentle and you won’t need to be told before you know u don’t need to joke with him. Take him for granted and you will pay dearly.

11. The Frustrated Lecturers — Men have at different times dealt with her, so she deals ruthlessly with all male students –smile or even attempt to borrow pen and you are out of the class for the rest of the semester.

How many have you come across in your school/school days?

 

 

 

 

 

 

FREEDAY FREE FOOD FOR FRIEND’S FREAKING FREETHINKING   Vol 274

SOME FACTS YOU NEED TO KNOW ABOUT THE NEWLY APPOINTED ‘CHIEF OF ARMY STAFF’.
MAJOR-GENERAL T.Y BURATAI.

1. Major-General T.Y Buratai hails From a Buratai town in Biu Local Government Area in Borno State, that has suffered greatly from the brutal threat of the Boko Haram terrorist group.

2. He was born on November 24, 1960.

3. He started his army career after he was admitted into the prestigious Nigerian Depence Academy in Kaduna in 1980, as a member of the 29th regular course.

4. Buratai joined the military with a Teacher’s Grade II Certificate, which he obtained with distinctions. He later attended the National Depence College Bangladesh.

5. He holds two Masters degrees, one In History from the University of Maiduguri and another in Philosophy from the Bangladesh University Professional, Dhaka.

6. Furthermore, Buratai attended the Disarmament, Demobilisation and Reintegration Course in the year 2000 Coenwills, Park Nova, Scotia, Canada, and attended the United Nations Staff and Logistics Officers Course, India.

7. When he was the Commander II, Brigade PH and Sector Command Joint Task Force – Operation Pulo Shield, He brought about improved in security In Rivers and Bayelsa state, launched the fight against oil theft, piracy, kidnapping, and armed robbery. He also greatly improved the barracks infrastructure in PH.

8. Until his new appointment yesterday, he was the Commander of Multinational Joint Task Force which has its headquarters In Ndjamena, Chad Republic.

9. Gen. Buratai whose hobbies comprise farming, squash rackets and jogging, is faced with the task of leading the troops to achieve this lofty objective.

10. One year ago, he commanded the then Joint Task Force in Niger-Delta.

May God help and guide him in discharging his duties, satisfactorily, and effectively. Amen.

Michael DrBiggie Adeyemi I's photo.

275. FREEDAY FREE FOOD FOR FRIENDS’ FREAKING FREETHINKING    Vol   275

Time for Gov. Ogbeni Rauf Aregbesola to face reality and do the needful

Gov. Rauf Aregbesola’s Osun is a State of 4m people with 40,000 workers whose monthly wage stands at 3.6b, Osun has not received up to 4b monthly since 2013, so ask how come Osun owes 9months salary and your bias and logic will fade.

When the sudden dip in global oil prices met with poor policing of our water ways and the concomitant theft of over 400,000barrels of crude oil per day, it wasn’t the making of the 21 states owing workers’ salaries but the failure of a Federal Govt that thrives on monolithic dependence on Oil.

It was the fault of a Federal Govt that handed over the policing of our water ways to ex-militants and ethnic militias. And it is the fault of a nation and a Nat. Assembly that has failed to review her Laws to allow for Resource Control and True Federalism.

Like the Federal Govt borrowed about 500b in the twilight of GEJ’s administration to pay Workers, the 21 States have borrowed at some point and can do no more; it is a combination of corruption, inability to look ahead, poor financial management and not saving for the rainy day.

If you yet wonder why the hoopla on Aregbesola, it is simply about an obsession against a foremost CHANGE Agent whose developmental projects speak volumes, and a bias by partisan commentators that call a dog a bad name for the slaughter.

Governor Ogbeni Rauf Aregbesola should get his acts together and pay workers salaries owed. He should as a matter of urgency reduce Osun state’s workforce ,rather than thinking of slashing their salaries by half. He should also slash his own security vote drastically and cut back on social services such as free school lunch program, paying or subsidizing the cost of religious pilgrimages. He has one of the highest number (if not the highest) of public primary and secondary schools in Nigeria. He can as well cut costs by returning mission schools to their original owners. This will legitimately cut down some of his overhead costs.

Gov. Aregbesola meant well, but his socialist principles and ideas are outdated. It is obvious Osun state cannot afford to pay for all the socialist populist programs Aregbesola introduced. It’s time for him to be prudent with the limited resources available to Osun state.

The groundswell of public opinion shows that Nigerians are increasingly shifting away from partisan prejudices to profound logic, away from crucify him to clear thought, and away from rumours to facts.

Ogbeni Aregbesola, I respect and admire your courage. But it’s time to face reality and be wise.

Additional credits : Chris Nwaokolobia

Gabriel Moses Oduntan

 

 

 

 

 

FREEDAY FREE FOOD FOR FRIENDS’ FREAKING FREETHINKING    Vol 277

Diary of a first-time hemp smoker

I had just moved out of my parents house and was sharing a

room with my “friend”. I had no idea he smoked weed,

despite his suspicious movements and signature weed

scent(abi na odour?) barely two weeks after moving in with

him, my worst fears were confirmed as he started bringing

home his weed smoking buddies and they would

occassionally roll a wrap and smoke it right there in the

room or mix the weed with beans or spagehtti.

Being a very curious person i always wondered what made

them happy after smoking, so i decided to find out for

myself(wrong move)

It was a very hot day in february, a saturday i think it was,

my friend was out as usual. I searched everywhere for his

stash but couldn’t find it so i decided to go and get mine. I

arrived the weed joint all sweaty and nervous, half

expecting to get muged but nobody seemed to be aware of

my presence there, they were all on different planets all

expect one i concluded that he must be the seller so i

approached him and the following conversation ensued:

Me: how far?

Weed seller: i dey

Me: i wan buy weed

Weed seller: how many parcel?

Me: parcel ke? Iro oo, na just small i need

Weed seller: laughs really hard. bolo leleyi sha(meaning

this guy is a dunce oo)

Apparently, a parcel of weed is that small wrap, i didn’t

know that. I thought it was something very large.

I gave him 1000naira and he gave me a tiny wrap of weed

with a white paper, i was suprised when he gave me 950 as

change. I couldn’t beleive weed was that cheap.

On my way home, i decided not to smoke it but mix it with

beans because i thought that it will be better that way

(another wrong move). Long story short, i cooked beans

and added the whole weed, ate it and called my friend, i told

him ogbeni i just ate weed oo and nothing happened to me

this one that you people will eat and be feeling funky, i don

chop am oo. My friend was like ehen you be strong man oo

I decided to take a quick nap before doing laundry, i woke

up about 20 minutes later on the floor i was banging my

head on the floor, and i couldn’t stop, my heart beat was so

audible and fast, everything was extra bright and extra loud.

After a few minutes of head banging, i was able to get up

from the floor,

I felt as if i had just gained access to a part of my mind that

I never knew existed previously, it was scary and cool at the

same time. I could feel the blood flowing in my veins(you

have to experience it to believe it. Though I strongly advise

against it) i felt so uncomfortable in the room, it felt like i

was in an oven suddenly a voice in my head wisphered

ogbeni bo aso e joor (off your clothes) i obeyed. The voice

came again oya sa re(now run) that was when i realised

that the weed had taken effect so i decided to take a shower

to see if it will calm me down, but the water felt so hot on

my skin so hot i ran out of the bathroom.

I called my friend to see if he could help me make sense of

what was going on but he laughed at me, he asked me the

quantity of weed i took and i told him i used a whole parcel,

he said guyyyyy you don eff up if you no sleep in the next

30mins, you go mad oo go chemist make you go explain

yourself.

By this time things had escalated, i had a severe itch at the

back of my head that wouldn’t go away no matter how hard

i scratched and i was convinced that the beating in my

chest was an evil spirit that could only be killed with a

punch.

I ran to my neighbour champion and told him

champion e jo e fun mi lese laya(champion pls punch me in

the chest) ti e ba gbami lese laya mo ma ku oo(if you don’t

punch me i will die oo) he hissed and walked out having

had enough of such nonsense from the boys in the boys

quarters.

The voice in my head came again iwo na o de gba ara e

lese laya abi o ti fe ku ni(why don’t you punch yourself in the

chest or do you want to die?) i punched and punched but

there was no difference.

The house was getting hotter, the voice in my head was

getting louder, the itch in my head was getting worse, and

the evil spirit in my chest was getting louder. Then came

the voice again oya ma sare lo(start running) so i started

running but on getting outside in the sun, i felt so cold i was

shivering but that didn’t stop me from running(i would have

given husain bolt a run for his money on that day).

On getting to the chemist, i realised i was bare footed, i told

him i had a severe headache i needed something to make

me sleep immediately, he gave me the drug and i chewed it

right there in his presence, next i asked him to give me a

drug for evil spirit, that was when he realised something

was wrong with me and chased me out.

I got back home and tried to sleep but my heart beat

wouldnt let me, so i ran back out this time around to a nurse

in the area, first thing she asked was kilode o wo bata ni?

(why don’t you have your shoes on?

I told her jackie chan ti

gba bata lowo mi (jackie chan collected my shoes) i was

finally able to explain my situation to her and she took me

in, tied something around my elbow and injected me directly

in the vein. I passed out immediately only to wake around 1

or 2am in the middle of the night with the worst kind of

hunger I have ever felt in my life. I ate a whole loaf of butter

field bread in one sitting without butter or tea.

I came home to a hero’s welcome, my friend told me e be

like say your head no carry am but e go better make you try

am once more so you go dey use to it. The following day

while the house was empty, I packed my Ghana must go

and like the prodigal son in the bible I went back home to

my parents.

It’s been a few years since that experience but

the lesson I learnt is an unforgettable one. My curiosity

hasn’t gotten me in trouble again and my circle of friends

have since changed.

Author unknown.

 

 

 

 

FREEDAY FREE FOOD FOR FRIENDS’ FREAKING FREETHINKING    Vol  279

Allegation of massive crude oil theft by PMB

Nigeria produces 2.4 million barrels of oil daily but due to oil theft here and there,accidents, oil leaks, force majeurs etc Nigeria’s production falls short of d 2.4million barrels per day. This has led to persistent shortages in Nigeria’s crude oil dependent budgets. Former minister of Finance – Okonjo Iweala said Nigeria produces (or is it exports) averagely between 1.8 to 2.1 million barrels of oil per day in the last few years.

Though the govt doesn’t want to admit it, crude oil theft is the major cause of those shortages. It’s been estimated Nigeria loses btw 250,000 and 400,000 barrels of crude oil per day due to the oil theft. The Ribadu report put oil theft at between 150,000 to 250,000 barrels of oil per day (This is a conservative estimate). This occurs despite the so-called militants creek /oil protection contracts. It’s an illegal act which occurs with collusion of corrupt security, oil and govt agents.

President. Buhari recently made an allegation of 250,000 barrels of oil being stolen per day in Nigeria. He went ahead to say some former govt ministers were stealing as much as 1 million barrels of Nigerian crude oil daily. Some of you argue that with an output of 2.4million barrels a day it is impossible to steal 1million barrels. I am arguing that with the aid and abbet of a President and maybe one other minister…A minister can systematically steal 1million barrels per day…NOT everyday but at intervals.

There are so many ways it can happen via sophisticated bureaucracy. Just as an example – Sanusi Lamido Sanusi ,former CBN governor once said that for 20months the NNPC remitted a deficit of $1billion dollars of crude oil proceeds per month.

That the President of the Federal Republic himself is making such a bold and public accusation, he must have had conclusive and empirical evidence.